12.08.2013

herbert: mandela and king were not warm and fuzzy, they were hard-core revolutionaries

Bob Herbert in Jacobin:
I knew that the tributes would be pouring in immediately from around the world, and I also knew that most of them would try to do to Mandela what has been done to the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: turn him into a lovable, platitudinous cardboard character whose commitment to peace and willingness to embrace enemies could make everybody feel good. This practice is a deliberate misreading of history guaranteed to miss the point of the man.

The primary significance of Mandela and King was not their willingness to lock arms or hold hands with their enemies. It was their unshakable resolve to do whatever was necessary to bring those enemies to their knees. Their goal was nothing short of freeing their people from the murderous yoke of racial oppression. They were not the sweet, empty, inoffensive personalities of ad agencies or greeting cards or public service messages. Mandela and King were firebrands, liberators, truth-tellers – above all they were warriors. That they weren’t haters doesn’t for a moment minimize the fierceness of their militancy.

Unlike King, Mandela accepted violence as an essential tool in the struggle. He led the armed wing of the African National Congress, explaining: “Our mandate was to wage acts of violence against the state… Our intention was to begin with what was least violent to individuals but most damaging to the state.” Ronald Reagan denounced him as a terrorist and Dick Cheney opposed his release from prison.

King was hounded by the FBI, repeatedly jailed, vilified by any number of establishment figures who despised his direct action tactics, and finally murdered. He was only 39 when he died. When King spoke out against the Vietnam war, characterizing the American government as “the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today,” the New York Times took him to task in an editorial headlined, “Dr. King’s Error.”

. . . . These were not warm and fuzzy individuals, fantasy figures for the personal edification of the clueless and the cynical. They were hard-core revolutionaries committed with every ounce of their being to the wholesale transformation of their societies. When giants like Mandela and King are stripped of their revolutionary essence and remade as sentimental stick figures to be gushed over by all and sundry, the atrocities that sparked their fury and led to their commitment can be overlooked, left safely behind, even imagined never to have occurred.

It’s a way for people to sidestep the everlasting shame of past atrocities and their own collusion in the widespread horrors of racism that are still with us.
Read it here.

6 comments:

John F said...

As long as we're sharing not-warm-and-fuzzy sentiments: Fuck Rob Anders. Seriously. Fuck that guy.

laura k said...

Hey, thanks for that. I was hoping someone would put Rob Anders in comments. What a buffoon. I don't know if it's in your link, but the CBC story I read on his reaction had great tweets in it.

laura k said...

Oh yes, it's the same article.

John F said...

How does that hateful little turd keep getting reelected, even in Calgary? I grew up (mostly) in Lethbridge, where people drink from the same conservative well, and I still don't get it.

laura k said...

I have wondered that. It doesn't speak well of that riding. (How's that for understatement?)

John F said...

Part of his riding association tried to oust him in 2010, but Harpergov cut them off at the knees. 24 people resigned

I've decided that he keeps getting elected for the same reason that Rob Ford's numbers went up in Etobicoke after he admitted hitting the pipe. I still have no idea what that reason is, but it's the same one....