12.17.2010

michael ignatieff hearts rob ford

Michael Ignatieff thinks Rob Ford's election as Mayor of Toronto bodes well for the federal Liberals: "The same people who elected Rob Ford elected me."

Good lord. The federal Liberals imagine they can refashion themselves as populist bullies who oppose public services, immigration, and "elites" - that is, the Michael Ignatieffs of the world?

Yet in the one area the Liberals could benefit from Rob Ford's experience - tough talk and strong campaigning - they are utterly bereft.

Michael Ignatieff, you will never get it right. And your party will never form a government until it dumps you.

12 comments:

Mike said...

Uh, Michael, you do realize Rob Ford's a hit with Conservative voters right? You know, the same party who form the Government that you're supposed to be the "Loyal Opposition" too? I know it's hard to realize that what with your constant caving in, but you're supposed to present an alternative if you expect people to vote for you and not the Harperites, just saying.

redsock said...

"The same people who elected Rob Ford elected me."

Alt. post title: "in which michael ignatieff reveals a bit too much about himself than he perhaps intended"

M@ said...

Michael Ignatieff, you will never get it right. And your party will never form a government until it dumps you.

I think it's worse than that, even -- the current governing party will form a majority if the Liberals don't dumb Ignatieff soon.

L-girl said...

the current governing party will form a majority if the Liberals don't dumb Ignatieff soon

That is the big fear, certainly, and everyone has said it for so long... which is why it's really hard for me to think it will happen. They didn't get their majority against Dion - who ran a campaign worthy of Michael Dukakis, it was that bad. Some of the ridings the Cons won by tiny margins have not worked out well, and may go back to the Liberals.

But of course it could happen. The Liberals are doing squat to prevent it.

I'm anxious for an election all the same.

M@ said...

Yes, I agree. And I don't fear an election either -- the sooner the better, for sure.

I guess my concern is that with Ignatieff doing nothing in opposition, it makes the narrative easy to put together for Harper. "Parliament isn't working, because our opposition leader doesn't do anything. If we form a majority, you'll see good things start to happen."

It's an easy narrative to put together when you have a wounded and not particularly intelligent duck as your opponent.

L-girl said...

M@, I'm glad you agree. You are very astute about politics, and your agreement validates my belief.

the sooner the better, for sure.

YES

It's an easy narrative to put together when you have a wounded and not particularly intelligent duck as your opponent.

Yes. Definitely. It's going to be very scary.

L-girl said...

On the other hand, the Conservatives have had a de facto majority for a long time.

M@ said...

the Conservatives have had a de facto majority for a long time.

True, but I think a CPC majority would be leagues beyond their coalition majority of today.

For example, a lot of their agenda was being held in check by parliamentary committees, who would either slow legislation down, or prevent legislation from being passed because it wasn't worth having it destroyed in committee.

Under the CPC, this has been a vital (though, I know, often ineffective) check on the aggressiveness of the CPC agenda. Chretien's years in power showed how a majority can completely nullify committees as part of the democratic process. I'd hate to see it in Harper's hands.

But, of course, there's this. It's always a useful question: where are the seats going to come from? However, this only holds true if the election results are roughly similar to the political climate before the election. If something really catches with the electorate during the campaign -- one issue, one talking point, one clown of an opposition leader -- all bets are off.

L-girl said...

True, but I think a CPC majority would be leagues beyond their coalition majority of today.

I agree completely.

Re that G&M article, I have also thought about that. They may win more overall votes but not win more seats. (Hooray for FPTP?)

My own riding looks to be hotly contested. Liberal MP Albina Guarnieri is retiring for health reasons. As we know, the Tories gained seats in several neighbouring ridings, once Liberal strongholds.

At least this time we can vote!

CK said...

"Michael Ignatieff, you will never get it right. And your party will never form a government until it dumps you."

Also, you seem anxious for an election.

Uh, you do realize that the NDP will never ever form government in our lifetime, right? Sorry, but pragmatism is called for these days and a lot less wishful thinking.

We know Iggy ain't goin' anywhere at least until after the next election.

So I really must ask this question here, if Stevie were somehow miraculously voted out of office next election, it would mean the Liberals get into power (although a minority), are you going to be very disappointed or relieved?

While you may either vote Green or NDP, we all know that it'll be either Liberal or Harpercon, which one would you rather see win?

CK said...

Yes, Mike, Rob Ford's a hit with Conservative voters, but from what I hear, voters of other stripes voted the Chris Farley look a like in too.

Reality is that the majority center of Jane & Joe Six Pack at Tim Horton's has been shifting rightward for sometime now, thanks to a right slanted media with a message Harper pretty much controls now.

Again, pragmatism is called for here during desperate times. Right now, the idea is not to take Canada further left, but, rather to prevent it from taking that final shove to Steve's far right. To attempt to go further left will back fire and Jane and Joe will be further enamored by Steve.

The liberals going after Green and NDP voters is slim pickin's; they need to go after Jane and Joe voters.

I find the trouble with many progressives today is that they have too high expectations from their fellow Canadians. In reality, we've been dumbed down. Racism and bigotry are on the rise.

I will play devil's advocate, yet again, here.

while it seems strange right now, that statement Iggy made about 'folks who voted for Ford also voted for him in Etobicoke,' on its' own, is probably true. The only problem with the statement is that he has to find a way to close that circle.

Right now, the Ontario PCs are spinning the Ford win in Liberal TO as a victory for them; that everyone is tired of the Liberals, provincial and federal. It might be wise for Iggy to try to make lemon aid from that lemon.

L-girl said...

CK, yes, "uh", I do know the NDP will not form a government. Thanks for the inisight.

We've been through this before. You come around to pimp the war-loving, torture-defender Michael Ignatieff as the somehow better alternative to Harper. But it's not enough to be "not Stephen Harper" in name only.

So I really must ask this question here, if Stevie were somehow miraculously voted out of office next election, it would mean the Liberals get into power (although a minority), are you going to be very disappointed or relieved?

Very relieved, and then new work begins. I would see that as a first step.

While you may either vote Green or NDP, we all know that it'll be either Liberal or Harpercon, which one would you rather see win?

I live in a Liberal riding that will be hotly contested by the Conservatives. The NDP typically does not run a candidate here or runs a junior member without significant support. I will likely vote Liberal to keep the Conservative from getting in.

It is highly unlikely that I would ever vote Green.

I've read your views on "the trouble with progressives today" and the people at Tim Horton's. I'm not impressed with your punditry.

The Liberals need to offer an alternative to the Conservatives - a liberal alternative. As long as they are Tory wannabes, they will continue to bleed seats and supporters. People who want Conservatives will vote Conservative, and people on the left end of the Liberal spectrum will vote NDP.

The further to the right the Liberals move, the less effective they will be, until there is no appreciable distinction between the two parties. Then the right wing of the Conservative party moves even further to the right. It's exactly what has happened in the US, and it's happening here.

The same goes for the NDP. They need to stop being Liberal wannabes and get back in touch with their socialist roots. Their constituency is hungry for it. They need to pay less attention to "I'm running for Prime Minister" and more attention to party principles.

Our job as progressives is to oppose and resist that rightward movement, not to accept it as inevitable.

If you shrug your shoulders and say "that's the way it is," then politics are just a game to you, a dynamic to observe and analyze and critique. In that case you are just a small version of the mainstream media. If you're a progressive person, you should be fighting for social justice, not playing political chess.

CK, this is at least the third time we've had this same conversation. I understand your point of view, but it has no traction for me. We don't need to go over the same ground again and again. Thanks.