11.09.2010

how to better it gets better

When I posted some videos from It Gets Better, there was a brief discussion in comments about some criticisms of the whole It Gets Better project. I didn't have time or patience to respond to those complaints, but directed readers to this post by msjacks of The Bitter Buffalo.

Now Impudent Strumpet has written a comprehensive and compassionate response to the critics of It Gets Better: "Building a better It Gets Better". If you're interested in this discussion, this is highly recommended reading.

4 comments:

John F said...

I was shocked when I read your post! It hadn't occurred to me that anyone outside of the Family Research Council crowd would find fault with "It Gets Better".

I think some of the critics want the project to be more than it is. It Gets Better is not a comprehensive program to promote LGBT equality. It's a lifeline to gay teens drowning in despair!

As to its urban, secular, higher education bias: hoo boy, these critics don't have a lot of experience with small towns, do they? Small towns are not inherently bad, but they are a LOT less diverse than cities. The further you are from average in any respect, the more isolating such a place will be. Don't like sports or drinking? No one will condemn you for that, but it's going to be harder to find a circle of friends. This is alleviated a bit if the town contains (you guessed it) a university.

L-girl said...

It Gets Better is not a comprehensive program to promote LGBT equality.

John, I think you've just nailed the problem with so much criticism of so many worthy initiatives. People look at one piece of a complex puzzle and slam it because it doesn't show the entire picture.

Isn't it enough that it does what it does? And have these critics noticed that when a project tries to do too much, it usually ends up doing nothing well?

Re IGB, I find it so frustrating that I couldn't blog about it myself! I end up just saying grrrr and WTF.

impudent strumpet said...

Now that I think about it, criticizing the urban bias without providing specific solutions/hope for non-urban people is very nearly cruel. It's like telling someone who's struggling with university that there are plenty of well-paying jobs that don't require university, but refusing to give them any examples.

L-girl said...

Now that I think about it, criticizing the urban bias without providing specific solutions/hope for non-urban people is very nearly cruel.

But it's so much easier than actually contributing anything.