10.11.2010

justice for fallujah: former marine speaks out

And finally, my last pass-along of the day, an important act of military resistance and peacemaking. Longtime reader deang shared The Justice For Fallujah Project, co-founded by Ross Caputi, a former US Marine who was involved in the terrible assault on that Iraqi city in 2004.

The Justice for Fallujah Project is raising awareness of the dramatic increases in birth defects - including brain damage, congenital heart defects and childhood cancers - and other serious illnesses in Fallujah since the US used illegal weapons there. I posted about this here, citing articles in the UK media on a "toxic legacy" in Fallujah "worse than Hiroshima".

Thank you, Ross Caputi. You are a true war resister.

9 comments:

L-girl said...

Comment spammer: I don't publish spam comments, no matter how "shocking" you think your "truth" is.

Nitangae said...

Well, the truth in the clip is shocking enough.

L-girl said...

The spammer's comment was defending the Marines' actions. Apparently the Iraqis caused their own injuries and diseases.

Some Person said...

Actually, the fact that he joined the marines out of selfish motives might have made his turn-around more likely. Had he joined for revenge or hypernationalism, he may well have committed atrocities that were consistent with his conscience.

L-girl said...

Could be. But many of the war resisters I know are people who originally enlisted for patriotic reasons, because they wanted to help, because they wanted to be part of something larger than themselves. When they realized they had been deceived and betrayed, they began to rethink their whole belief system.

If only more people did...

redsock said...

brain damage, congenital heart defects and childhood cancers

Freedom ain't free.

Some Person said...

redsock, my eyes squeezed shut and my gut tightened as if it were punched when I read that. Very succinct.

I think those war resisters you know, L-girl, were motivated by a more nobler version of nationalism than the one I referenced. It is quite the teachable moment when the call to public service means mutilation, carnage, and losing one's soul.

Nitangae said...

Well, Some Person, as your reference to selfishness suggests, our ignoble motives are hard to remove from our noble ones. In capitalist society, selfishness itself often is treated as a goal in itself (why should I worry about Global Warming - it is the Bangladeshi who will suffer!; I understand that the Lubicon have land rights and the people of Fort Chip have the right not to suffer from cancer - but if we slow the Oil Sands down I might not pay off my house; what is in it for me! ); I suppose you could say that those whose nationalism causes them to reflect on the violence committed by their nation have a better sort of nationalism, just as one could say that Christians who reflect on the abuses of Christianity have a better sort of Christianity, or, people who truly understand their own desire to gain advantage also understand and respect other people's (including Lubicon Cree and Bangladeshi) similar desires. I don't know if this helps us much.

L-girl said...

I think those war resisters you know, L-girl, were motivated by a more nobler version of nationalism than the one I referenced.

Yes, I believe so. I'm glad I never had patriotic feelings for my country of origin. I never had to feel that betrayal.

The selfish vs unselfish discussion Nitangae and SP reference is interesting in many contexts. People are accused of doing things for selfish reasons by those who have made different choices, also for selfish reasons.

Selfishness is supposedly "natural" - another word thrown around when it's convenient for an argument.

Hmm, I feel a post coming on. :)