1.11.2010

i'd rather be blogging

I love today's Daily Dose of Imagery. Some of those "kids today" who don't read anymore. Publishers and booksellers know it's not true. Youth librarians all over the country know, too.

This future youth librarian has to prepare a presentation on two chapters of this book, due tomorrow morning. Allan has a post in the works, so I'll turn wmtc over to him* later today.

Another important note about today: it's a palindrome. 011110.





* Never!

16 comments:

James said...

I think the success of the Twilight movies shows that "kids today" are reading, though it doesn't say much about their choice of reading material. ;)

Another important note about today: it's a palindrome. 011110.

Only if you use the almost-exclusive-to-the-US mmddyy convention... Under the ISO standard yyyymmdd format the palindrome was last week, on 20100102 :)

L-girl said...

I think the success of the Twilight movies shows that "kids today" are reading, though it doesn't say much about their choice of reading material. ;)

Yes, I agree. :)

Twilight, and before that Harry Potter, and before that, something else. It's not all quality, but it's all good, from the promoting reading POV.

Only if you use the almost-exclusive-to-the-US mmddyy convention

To palindrome-lovers, you do what it takes!

I personally use 11 Jan 10. I hate yyyy/mm/dd. Truly hate putting the year first, and I'll never do it. But I'll take a palindrome anywhere I see one. :)

James said...

The best thing about Twilight has been the movie reviews and commentary: Twilight Quotes That Make You Go OMGWTF, Why “Twilight” is hurting America, Ew Moon: Why Twilight continues to hurt America…

I personally use 11 Jan 10. I hate yyyy/mm/dd. Truly hate putting the year first, and I'll never do it. But I'll take a palindrome anywhere I see one. :)

But yyyy/mm/dd matches the number system perfectly -- larger positions first, smaller at the end. As a result, the great thing about yyyy/mm/dd dates is that putting them in plain numerical order automatically puts them in chronological order as well.

L-girl said...

the great thing about yyyy/mm/dd dates is that putting them in plain numerical order automatically puts them in chronological order as well.

And the stupid thing about yyyy/mm/dd is that I already know what year it is, that doesn't change for 365 days. But I need to know what day it is every day, and it's always different. But yyyy/mm/dd doesn't give me that information until the end of the string.

I want to know what day it is, then what month, then what year, in order of what changes most frequently.

Recently on Joy of Sox, there was a discussion about parking one's car head-in (as most USians learn to drive) or backing in (as most Canadians learn to drive). To me, this falls under the same category: personal preference, what you're used to, neither actually "better" than the other.

James said...

But I need to know what day it is every day, and it's always different. But yyyy/mm/dd doesn't give me that information until the end of the string.

Wouldn't dd/mm/yyyy be best, then? mm/dd/yyyy puts the most frequently changing thing in the middle. :)

To me, this falls under the same category: personal preference, what you're used to, neither actually "better" than the other.

Not entirely. If you deal with computers and name your dated files using "mmddyyyy", you'll get a list of all files made in Januaries first, regardless of year, then all ones made in Februaries, etc -- generally not as useful as grouping them by year.

Worst of all is "Mon dd yyyy" (like "Jan 10, 2010"), in which case we get all files from Aprils first, then Augusts, then Februaries... :P

L-girl said...

Wouldn't dd/mm/yyyy be best, then? mm/dd/yyyy puts the most frequently changing thing in the middle. :)

And the middle is better because...?

Assuming all the characters are the same size, the first thing you see is the thing you see first. :)

Computer needs are a separate issue. I'm talking about what humans do to interact with other humans.

James said...

Wouldn't dd/mm/yyyy be best, then? mm/dd/yyyy puts the most frequently changing thing in the middle. :)

And the middle is better because...?


That's what I was asking. The "mm/dd/yy" format for "011110" puts the day in the middle...

Computer needs are a separate issue. I'm talking about what humans do to interact with other humans.

Computers don't care one way or the other... It's people dealing with computers who benefit from yyyy/mm/dd.

Of course, the whole calendar is only borderline rational, thanks to the fact that days don't divide evenly into lunar months, and neither days nor lunar months divide evenly into years. And what do weeks have to do with anything, really? :)

L-girl said...

That's what I was asking. The "mm/dd/yy" format for "011110" puts the day in the middle...

So you'd have to ask someone who prefers mm/dd/yy. As I said above, I prefer and use dd/mm/yy.

But their answer is likely to be "because that's the way I learned it," which is the reason for a large variety of behaviour that is not strictly rational.

And of course by "computer needs," I mean the needs of people when dealing with computers.

Weeks are biblical, I think. But without them, the fight for weekends off would have been a lot harder!

James said...

Weeks are biblical, I think. But without them, the fight for weekends off would have been a lot harder!

Apparently, the Mayan Tzolk'in calendar had two sets of weeks that ran simultaneously, one of 13 numbered days and one of 20 named days. The count went like "1 First, 2 Second, ... 12 Twelfth, 13 Thirteenth, 1 Fourteenth, 2 Fifteenth, ... 6 Twentieth, 7 First, ..." etc (except with proper Mayan names, not "First, Second, etc"). It takes 260 days for things to get back around to "1 First". I wonder how you'd fit weekends into that. :)

L-girl said...

A 260-day work week - maybe then people would see that unions are necessary!

redsock said...

It's a shame I'm not getting control over the blog. I have some good ideas on how to improve it.

As a result, the great thing about yyyy/mm/dd dates is that putting them in plain numerical order automatically puts them in chronological order as well.

Yes, perfect for lists of various concert recordings.

Speaking of dates, what's the deal with something like "Jan 11/10" for today or "Oct 16/63" for my birthday? One attorney at work does it a lot, but I recently saw it someplace else. Is the shorthand specific to an industry?

L-girl said...

Speaking of dates, what's the deal with something like "Jan 11/10" for today or "Oct 16/63" for my birthday? One attorney at work does it a lot, but I recently saw it someplace else. Is the shorthand specific to an industry?

Funny you asked this, as I just dealt with this yesterday. Jan 11/10 is the standard in the law firm where I work, too. Everyone uses it, so for clarity, I use it, too.

Yesterday, my co-worker signed a whole bunch of dates as Jan/09, Jan/09, Jan/06 - but these were day, not years. She wrote Jan/06 to mean 06 Jan 10.

I was implicated in these dates and I knew our supervisor wouldn't understand. I had to change the dates and explain to my co-worker why.

James said...

"Weird Al" Yankovic had a good one for today on Twitter:

Happy "Binary Number 30" Day! (1/11/10)

L-girl said...

It's a shame I'm not getting control over the blog. I have some good ideas on how to improve it.

Yeah, like letting you control it! :)

johngoldfine said...

Just reading the amazon description of the book made my adrenaline rush and my cheeks flush. There's a certain kind of cleverness that delights in irrefutably proving with logic what can't be sustained for a second outside of the philosopher's study.

L-girl said...

Wow, that's well said! I find a zillion holes in his pronouncements and theories, holes that logical, civil-liberty-loving humans, lawmakers and courts can drive great big freedom-of-expression trucks through.