10.10.2009

the red menace

I hope by now you've all seen the sarcastic piece from SF Gate making the obvious point that public libraries are hotbeds of radical socialism.
For far too long, this menace has undermined the very foundations of our economy. While companies like Amazon and Barnes & Noble struggle valiantly each day to sell books, these communistic cabals known as libraries undercut the hard work of good corporate citizens by letting people read their books for free. How is the private sector supposed to compete with free? And just what does this public option give us? People can spend hours and hours in these dens of socialism without having to buy so much as a cappuccino. Furthermore, not only can anyone read books for free in the library, they can take them home, too. They get a simple card that can be used at any library in town. No checking on the previous condition of books they've read. No literacy test. Nothing. Yet, do these libertines of literature let you choose any book you want, anytime you want it? No. Have you ever tried to get the latest best-seller at a public library? They put you on a waiting list for that, my friend. And if you do ask these government apparatchiks a question about a book, they start talking your ear off, and pretty soon they're telling you what to read.

But have you thought about that other red menace, the US Congress? "Socialized Medicine is Good Enough for Congress," from Matthew Yglesias:
What's noteworthy here isn't just the existence of the perk, it's the specific form. Congress could have voted itself higher salaries. Or better travel benefits. Or larger appropriations so the congressional cafeterias can serve better food. But or just more generous health insurance. But what they wanted here was socialized medicine — health care that's not only financed by the state but directly provided by government employees. This kind of state-provided health care is basically universal in the UK, it accounts for an important chunk of the health care in Sweden, and it's what we give to our veterans in the United States. But most members of congress claim regard it as a horrifying prospect. And yet in practice they appear to like it just fine.

Thanks to Joe Grav.

4 comments:

Mark Francis said...

I really think an organization should be set up to push the banning of libraries, just to make the point with irony.

John F said...

Like that Libertarian said, libraries are just welfare book stores! If you give those people free access to information, who knows what they'll want next...

richard said...

The library thing reminded me of this tongue-in-cheek campaign for privatized fire departments.
http://angrytownhall.com/

L-girl said...

Oh yes, I joined that on Facebook! The same friend sent me all of these. Thanks for posting it here.

On the FB group, a huge number of commenters had no idea it was satire.