9.18.2009

the i-school and me

I'm not really in library school. Not yet, anyway.

The Faculty of Information at the University of Toronto calls itself an "iSchool," and claims to be the only such school in Canada. There are other graduate schools for library science, but an iSchool purports to have a broader focus. It's true, but it's also a marketing position.

The iSchool offers a PhD program, a Master of Museum Science, and a Master of Information (MI), which is my degree goal. (There are some other programs, like a combined MI/JD, and various other obscure combinations.) Within the Master of Information, there are a few different areas of concentrations, or paths: Library and Information Science, Archives and Records Management, Critical Information Studies, Information Systems and Design and Knowledge Management and Information Management.

They've introduced a new core curriculum required for all MI students regardless of path: Knowledge and Information in Society; Representation, Organization, Classification, and Meaning-Making; Information Systems, Services and Design; and Information Workshop, that integrates the other three. The core curriculum is supposed to give a thematic framework and provide context for future study.

About half the students in my classes are taking the library sciences path, and the other half is a mix of the other disciplines. The professors in both my classes asked us to introduce ourselves and say a few words about our background and goals; it was interesting to hear where people are coming from and what they want to do. There are IT professionals, systems designers, historians, artists, folklorists, and on and on - a very broad range of interests and perspectives.

Yesterday and today, I read several articles - as I will continue to do throughout the term - examining society's relationship to technology on a very theoretical and abstract level: how can humans' relationship to technology be seen, analyzed and discussed?

Perhaps a look at the weekly topics of the two courses I'm taking will give a better idea. These are the topic titles and my brief note as the prof went through each one.
Knowledge and Information in Society: course topic overview

Week 2: Myths and Imaginaries of Information Age
language, metaphors, images, maps representing information age

Week 3: Information Ethnography
apply social science concepts/frameworks/vocabulary to information age

Week 4: Political Economy of Information
who’s running the show? who exercises political and economic power in information field?

Week 5: Information as Property and as Common Resource
who owns information on social networking sites, on mmorpgs, forums; copyright laws as they apply or might apply to information

Week 6: Internet Governance
what’s at stake, who governs, how do they govern [not only internet – all our info]

Week 7: Sovereignty, Citizenship & Consumerism
where does social change happen?

Week 8: ICT4D
Information & Communication Technologies for Development - is such a thing really possible, what is commonly believed, what might work

Week 9: Surveillance & Control
who gets to see your information and what can they do with that information, what power do they have over you – asymmetry of surveillance
can surveillance be imagined in a more benign or more accountable way?

Week 10: Policy Issues: Privacy, Identity & Access
privacy: our ability to retain control of our information [ID card, enhanced driver’s licence, r’ship btn you & your ID dox]
access: your access to information about yourself
[see Ipsi, Identity, Privacy, Security Institute, lectures archived online]

Week 11: Sociology of Knowledge
Donna Haraway, Bruno Latour – most prominent in field

Week 12: Information Education & Professionalism
what binds us together w/in multidisciplinary field; how to define information professionals; codes of conduct w/in field

Week 13: Integrative Round Table

I feel a bit strange about the whole thing. A bit resentful. A bit like I'm in the wrong place.

I love learning, and I'm interested in a very broad range of topics. So it's not that these topics are uninteresting. As a writer, blogger and activist, someone concerned with freedom of expression and access to information, I'll probably find at least some of it relevant to my interests.

But none of it is what I would choose to be doing right now.

For me, this program is a means to an end. I need a career change. I need it financially, and I'm increasingly realizing that I need it physically. (As I get older, the repetitive stress injuries will become more severe and more frequent.) I think I'll make a great librarian. I think it's meaningful work that I will enjoy, and will help me live a more comfortable life.

But do I really need this Master of Information program to become a good librarian? I doubt it. But some combination of academic and professional gatekeepers have decided that I do. So here I am reading about "the social constructions of technological systems" and "technology and heterogeneous engineering".

And I resent it because it's not want I want to read (even though I might find the reading interesting). The list of things I want to read is very long and always growing, and I have so little time to read. And now I'm spending precious reading time reading this other stuff, taking me off my plan.

That's how I feel about the whole program. Like it's a great big detour taking me out of what I want to do. But I also know I need to do this and it's the right thing to do. A contradiction, but there you go.

This is similar to how I felt about going to New Mexico for my nephew's wedding. I love my nephew so much, and it was an honour and a joy to attend his wedding. I had a great time with my family, and a terrific time driving, hiking and exploring with Allan. But... there are so many places I want to go, so many trips I want to make and can't afford. And on some level, I disliked and somewhat resented having to spend my scarce travel dollars on a trip not of my own choosing.

I live with a constant and profound sense of time moving very quickly, and being finite. My active time is further limited by my health issues. This is what underlies my need to be organized and not waste time, my need to have a game plan or defined approach to almost everything I do: my deep need to experience as much of life as I can. Anything that takes me off my game plan annoys me.

Of course, changing careers is part of my game plan right now, so this is what I have to do. Yet I can't help but think that I could become a qualified librarian through a one-year training course followed by on-the-job training, the latter being the way I've learned how to do almost everything.

On the positive side, this process feels very concrete and circumscribed. I have to complete 16 courses. I can check them off as I go, and after 16 check marks, I'll have my Master of Information degree. The process is much more clearly defined than so many things I've done. How does one become a writer? There's no clear path to that goal, it's mostly self-defined, and the standards are all subjective. By contrast, school will be easy.

And as I said, I do think it will be interesting. I just wish I didn't have to do it.

More banal thoughts on my first days of classes coming next.

10 comments:

Amy said...

Hmm, and I thought those courses sound WAY more interesting than law school courses. I hope that you are more excited once the courses and readings are under way. It will be hard to slog through a program if you feel like I did about law school---that is, that every course is a chore and a means to an end. Somehow I believe that once you are engaged in class discussions, you will find these topics more interesting, even if not directly related to what you ultimately want to do. Best of luck!

(BTW, I do get the whole thing about wanting to choose what you want to read, rather than being forced to read something else. It's one reason I have never joined a book group.)

L-girl said...

Oh, the reading is well underway. On the first day, I was already behind.

The courses may sound more interesting than law school, but then, that's personal taste. I have friends who loved law school, and I'm sure there are people who will love these Information courses.

I do find it very difficult to motivate myself when I'm not engaged - I discovered that quickly enough when I accepted writing jobs just for money with no other interest. But wanting to do well in school is a big motivation for me.

Thanks for the vote of confidence and good wishes. :)

deang said...

I felt exactly like you described yourself feeling as I read some of those course titles notes: resistant and even a bit angry. When I was briefly in a similar program around twenty years ago, several of my classmates wondered the same thing: wouldn't some brief certification program be sufficient for us to work helping people and making collection decisions in libraries? And then later working in another university setting, I learned that many students in our newly-renamed information school hated the term library, referring to it as "the L-word", and I was doubly glad I hadn't continued in the program. With your drive and organization, you'll make it through fine, but my resentment was so strong I couldn't continue with such a program, at least not in my early 20s.

L-girl said...

When I was briefly in a similar program around twenty years ago, several of my classmates wondered the same thing: wouldn't some brief certification program be sufficient for us to work helping people and making collection decisions in libraries?

I really dislike and resent the whole credential-inflation phenomenon. It's something I've meant to write about and just haven't yet.

So many careers that are best learned with a bit of training and an entry-level job now require masters degrees. It's ridiculous.

Formal education is not for everyone, it's incredibly expensive, and it's not even especially predictive of whether or not a person will be good in the field. It's just a huge barrier that serves universities and academics, and keeps people out of certain professions.

I learned that many students in our newly-renamed information school hated the term library, referring to it as "the L-word"

Ugh!! I don't think it's quite like that here. However, even in the first day of class, when a student referred to "library school", the prof said, "It's Faculty of Information, actually". He said it gently, but why say it at all?

I am resentful. I don't like having to do this. But I am highly motivated to do it anyway.

I can well understand why you didn't. Also I remember your saying you were not computer-literate at the time and there was a great emphasis on electronic sources, research, etc. That would be very hard.

deang said...

I remember your saying you were not computer-literate at the time and there was a great emphasis on electronic sources, research, etc. That would be very hard.

That was difficult. I was completely lost. It doesn't sound so unreasonable now, but in 1989 the fact that my library courses required all papers to be produced using word processing programs was kind of unusual. None of the linguistics or anthropology courses I was also taking in those years required that; they were concerned primarily with content and many students typed or hand-wrote their assignments. Computer requirements wouldn't be so hard for me now.

impudent strumpet said...

It'll be interesting to see how much of this ends up being relevant in ways you never anticipated, and how much of it ends up being WTF. Of the "Why do we need to know this?" stuff that I learned in uni, 60% of it I saw the need for in the workplace, 20% of it to this day I have no idea how it ever ended up on the curriculum in the first place, and 10% I didn't understand why we were being taught it until I saw translations by people who were never taught it.

L-girl said...

Yes, it will be interesting to see. And I understand the value of having a conceptual framework. As a writer, there's a huge difference when I'm trying to write something that I have a clear but superficial understanding of, versus something I am extremely well grounded in theory and concept. So I do get that.

I'll throw that in among the other contradictions.

Lisa said...

Definitely not banal thoughts! You put into words what has been bothering me about all of this perfectly.

I will have to email you, because this could become a rant and not a comment.

I will say this though : I work closely with student assistants (young undergraduates) at my current "job" (soon to become "profession":), and I have been so surprised at how many of them plan to do a Master's Degree...for no other reason than it will make them more competitive in the job market.

When I was younger (yes, I'm 40..:), one did a Master's degree because it was a bridge to a Ph.D - academia. These days it seems that young people get Master's for the same reason I got my B.A..which was the same reason my dad only got his high school diploma..because that was all he needed...to get the credentials to get the job.

The overcredentializing of society drives me nuts. Jane Jacobs wrote about this problem in the Dark Age Ahead.

Having said all this, I think that the intro courses are a bit of intro nonsense, and you will probably find the other courses WAY more practical...and useful. I mean, how well do you really understand the Library of Congress Classification System :)

Think of it as professional development :)

L-girl said...

Definitely not banal thoughts!

The banal thoughts are in the next post. :)

I will have to email you, because this could become a rant and not a comment.

Do me a favour, if you're going to rant, do it here, ok? You're more than welcome to.

These days it seems that young people get Master's for the same reason I got my B.A..which was the same reason my dad only got his high school diploma..because that was all he needed...to get the credentials to get the job.

Right. It's frustrating.

It does sound like later courses are more practical. I hope they're less work, too! The workload already feels a bit overwhelming.

Lisa said...

"Do me a favour, if you're going to rant, do it here, ok? You're more than welcome to. "

I know. It's a combination of not wanting to post lengthy rants, and not wanting to post public rants...

Or perhaps, rants v. simple comments. Which I should really try to get the hang of...:)

The workload is intense. I hear it gets easier!?