3.21.2008

advice, part 4

There's been a sharp increase in the number of emails I've been receiving from Americans who want to emigrate to Canada. There's no way to know (yet) if this means more people are actually applying, or simply that more people are finding this blog. In any case, people have been very appreciative of wmtc, and that is very gratifying for me.

My earlier "advice" posts are here, here and here. In this fourth advice post, I want to address some general concerns about moving to Canada.

Writer "RB" speaks for many when he says:
I have one question though: what is this business about "Canadian experience" for jobs? I've read a few internet sites that had tirades on how hard it is for immigrant workers to get jobs due to lack of this "Canadian experience" business. Some of the sites were run by South Asian immigrants and it sounded like they ran into some racist employers. Did you have any issues with this? Or heard of this?

Also I heard this same bit from a woman who is an American in the GTA ... [who wrote this essay] ... about how Canada is not the answer and that Canadians hate Americans and I shouldn't plan on getting a job since they want this "Canadian experience". I emailed her and she told me that straight up: "Oh, they hate Americans and you won't get a job". . . .

I've never had issues visiting there. I work with a half dozen Canadians at the hospital where I work, they're just like anybody else, just less bull-headed about their country I think.

RB's email brings up several points that I can address.

  • I think it's best to avoid the immigrant forums on the internet. I know that many people disagree with this, and some in our moving-to-Canada blogging family became very connected to the communities there. This is purely my personal opinion.

    In my experience, the information on these forums can be highly suspect, and is often flat-out wrong. And like many sites all over the internet, the immigrant forums tend to be places where people vent and complain about negative experiences. I would never deny anyone's experience, but when you hear someone vent, you're only hearing their version of events, you don't know what they contributed to the experience, what their expectations were, or even their general truthfulness.

    I found that the version of Canada presented on the immigrant forums to be so totally different from the Canada I live in that I didn't even recognize it.

    If you know you want something, and you believe it is right for you, I think it's best to go with your own feelings and not be too influenced by people for whom that same choice did not work out.

  • When Americans in Canada - often conservative Americans who are here on business, not necessarily by their choice - say Canadians are anti-American, they usually mean that Canadians don't approve of everything the US does, and are openly critical of the US.

    But Canadians are also openly critical of Canada. In general, in Canada, you're not expected to shut up and salute. In general, Canadians are not defensive about Canada as Americans are about the US. But most Americans don't even realize they are defensive. They defend the US by reflex, and they regard criticism of the US as a personal insult. If that's your attitude, then of course you're going to hear anti-Americanism everywhere.

    What's more, most people easily distinguish between the US government and individual Americans - especially if you've moved to Canada to get away from that government!

  • I don't think there is a lot of anti-immigrant prejudice here, at least not in the GTA. I'm not saying there's no racism here. That would be absurd. But in general, Canada - especially the GTA and (from what I hear) the Vancouver area - is so heavily dependent on immigration, and immigrants are so much a part of the fabric of society, that it's hard for people simply to be anti-immigrant.

    One thing is certain, no one will hate you because you're American. Some Canadians might worship you a bit because of that, some might jokingly say, "Sorry to hear that". Most won't care. And no one will treat you any differently.

  • So far I have not heard of one American immigrant who has had trouble finding work because they lacked Canadian experience.

    My partner and I both found employment right away, and so did almost every other US-to-Canada immigrant we know. One person did have trouble finding work; I don't think that was because he lacked Canadian experience, he just had some employment trouble. Depending on your field, you may have to get re-credentialed, and that can be an issue, so you certainly want to investigate that in advance.

    But most of the US-to-Canada immigrants we know have been very successful. These include people who are lawyers, nurses, social workers, in the telecom industry, secretaries, teachers, IT professionals... in other words, a whole range of jobs and professions. If anything, our US experience is looked on as worthwhile and important.

    * * * *

    The other concern is more general, about the lengthy application process, and my advice is more general life advice. It might not work for you, but it did work for me, so for what it's worth, I will share it.

    I know the application process is very daunting, even overwhelming. There were certainly times I felt overwhelmed - and everyone I know who has emigrated here felt the same way. Try to remember, as with any process: one step at a time. Make it your mantra.

    While we were going through the application process, and certainly during the transition itself, I found it very useful to think in small chunks of time.

    I would take one step, and try not to think too far past that stage. Then that stage would be accomplished and I'd move on to the next. If I thought too far into the future, I would feel the anxiety creeping in. So I would pull myself back to the task at hand.

    First, read everything on the CIC site, finding what pertains to you and digesting that material. Only that. Not too much more.

    Then, print out the application, read through it, make lists of what documents you'll need to assemble.

    Then, start to assemble those documents. That takes time, so get the process going, and while you're waiting, continue investigating Canada.

    Make lists and lists and lists, and keep plugging away. One step at a time.

    This is how you write a book, or go to law school, or accomplish almost anything. One step at a time.

    Remember: if you meet the qualifications, if you can come up with the money, if you have never been convicted of a felony - and if you jump through all the hoops, one at a time - you will get here.

    It takes time, but what Big Life Change doesn't? If you went back to school or changed careers, that would take time to accomplish. Leaving the US for Canada is the same thing. (But better!)

    In 2006, almost 11,000 Americans made the move. When the numbers come in for 2007, I think it will be even higher. We all did it and so can you.
  • 37 comments:

    tommy said...

    i love your site and appreciate the amount of work you put into this. i am one of those americans dreaming of a move to canada. i have been summering in canada for close to 20 years and am reaching a point in my life that i think i'm ready to make the move permanent. the fact that i'm 49 and you start losing points after 50 has spurred me on. i'm a southerner and you cannot begin to imagine how rightwing and repressive the south is. it IS NOT getting better. the conservative group-think is very oppressive.

    heres my question for you, did you renounce your american citizenship? i would think that in my case when or if that becomes an option will be very liberating. also does the american government put any limits on the amount of money you can transfer to canada when you immigrate?

    thanks for everything you do. you speak for thousands of americans and we love you!

    L-girl said...

    Tommy, thank you so much. :)

    did you renounce your american citizenship? i would think that in my case when or if that becomes an option will be very liberating.

    I have not done that (yet?), because I don't yet have Canadian citizenship. You have to be a Permanent Resident 3 years before you can apply for citizenship. We are almost there!

    After we gain Cdn citizenship, then we'll decide about the US. Part of me REALLY wants to do it... but I also want to be assured of being able to travel freely back and forth across the border to see my family and friends. If Cdn-US relations change, the US passport would help with that.

    So it's up in the air. I don't know.

    also does the american government put any limits on the amount of money you can transfer to canada when you immigrate?

    Not that I'm aware of. You can also keep money in a US bank account if you want, and transfer it (or not) at a later date. We still have a bank account in NYC. There's almost nothing in it, but... it's there.

    Also...

    the fact that i'm 49 and you start losing points after 50 has spurred me on.

    ...this is great. Very important!

    Good luck with the application. Feel free to stay in touch.

    West End Bob said...

    L-Girl:

    Great post!! Im looking forward to "part 5 . . . . "

    Tommy:

    Don't waste time! My partner and I are 55 and 56 and just got our Canadian PR cards - a 2+ year journey. "Come on up - the water's fine!"

    L-girl said...

    Thanks Bob :)

    tommy said...

    i think your advice about taking things one step at a time is good. sorta like eating an elephant..one bite at a time. i understand that canada doesnt make it easy but then again it shouldnt be easy. its too important to canada and to those wishing to immigrate to just recklessly open the doors without thorough processes. i look forward to the application process and the journey that i'm about to begin.

    one other question if dont mind. is quebec an easier road? montreal is where i would ultimately like to end up but if its more difficult to go through quebec immigration i will happily "survive" in the gta for a few years.

    L-girl said...

    is quebec an easier road?

    I don't know if it's easier, but it is a separate road. If you have good French and want to apply to Quebec directly, you can do that.

    We love Montreal and would love to live there, but because we don't speak French, and we were moving up here without jobs, it seemed stupid to limit our employment opportunities so much. (Also, Toronto has American League baseball.)

    But because of that, I don't know much about the Quebec application process. I only know it is its own separate application, and if French is not your first language you will have to take a language competency test.

    You can certainly apply federally and then move to Montreal if that's what you want. Once you're a Permanent Resident, you can live anywhere in Canada, including Quebec.

    redsock said...

    i understand that canada doesnt make it easy but then again it shouldnt be easy.

    Well, it's really not hard either.

    Just make sure, when you are filling out the application, to take the extra time to re-read everything several times to make sure you understand what is required.

    Those extra hours are next to nothing compared to the delay if the application gets kicked back.

    impudent strumpet said...

    The Quebec eligibility assessment

    L-girl said...

    Thanks, ImpStrump!

    M. Yass said...

    I think it's best to avoid the immigrant forums on the internet.

    [...]

    In my experience, the information on these forums can be highly suspect, and is often flat-out wrong.


    Flat-out wrong is most often the case, I found. I've had people on various U.S.-to-Canada immigration sites swear up, down and sideways that you can be refused for having bad credit. Uhh . . . a cursory glance at the form will tell you that's not the case. It doesn't even ask about credit issues. Given that many people immigrate to start new lives, the number of successful applications would drop by a lot if that were the case, I think. And the fact that U.S. and Canadian credit are completely separate has been well documented here. ;)

    Quite honestly, I sometimes suspect that anti-immigrant types deliberately post disinformation to those forums as part of some perverted crusade to dissuade applicants.

    But Canadians are also openly critical of Canada. In general, in Canada, you're not expected to shut up and salute.

    You know, growing up in the 80s, I was told that we had to build enough nuclear weapons to blow up the world 300 times to keep the country from becoming like Russia. It's looking more like Russia every day, isn't it?

    In general, Canadians are not defensive about Canada as Americans are about the US.

    Not only that, I've found that Canadians can laugh at themselves a lot more than Americans can. I remember reading that when Sacha Baron Cohen butchered the U.S. national anthem ("Kazakhstan number one . . . exporter of potassium . . . ") that his very life was in danger. By contrast, the CBC runs the "Bob & Doug MacKenzie Two-Four Anniversary Special" here. It's a hilarious parody of Canadian stereotypes.

    Gotta love CBC, eh? A public broadcaster that has both Peter Mansbridge and Don Cherry is pretty cool.

    What's more, most people easily distinguish between the US government and individual Americans - especially if you've moved to Canada to get away from that government!

    Most of the Canadians I've met smile and nod understandingly when I tell them I'm an American who just moved to Canada. I've had a few over to watch Sicko. After seeing that flick, the number of health care-related complaints from them seems to drop precipitously.

    Incidentally, I've had contact with Canadian health care already. When I pulled out my Visa card to pay the copay, the woman at the desk looked at me like I was crazy. "You're an American, eh? No one pays here," she said. "Put your money away." And people in the waiting room don't have that pained, "how-the-hell-am-I-going-to-pay-for-this?" looks on their faces that I've seen - and had myself - so many times.

    By contrast, I'm probably going to end up helping my mum file bankruptcy because of her medical bills. In the richest civilization man has ever known. What a fucking travesty.

    But in general, Canada - especially the GTA and (from what I hear) the Vancouver area - is so heavily dependent on immigration, and immigrants are so much a part of the fabric of society, that it's hard for people simply to be anti-immigrant.

    I would definitely say that's true of Vancouver. It's almost to the point where white people are a minority here. I have a very hard time envisioning anyone loudly espousing anti-immigrant sentiment. And Canadian politeness is well documented. The country's motto seems to be "now now, let's not get all excited." That is, unless hockey is somehow part of the equation . . .

    I think you've said it best multiple times - Canada needs immigrants. This is especially true in western Canada, most notably Alberta, and is becoming true in the other prairie provinces such as Manitoba.

    One thing is certain, no one will hate you because you're American.

    Bang on.

    Some Canadians might worship you a bit because of that, some might jokingly say, "Sorry to hear that". Most won't care. And no one will treat you any differently.

    As I said, most will smile and nod understandingly. Many will say they feel you made the right choice. "You know, if I were an American, I'd want to move to Canada too" is a common response.

    One thing you're sure to run into are questions about the upcoming presidential election. I've repeatedly had to explain why Obama and Billary are fighting each other even though they're from the same party. Comments about Harper being "Bush Lite" are also very common. It's really funny to see the awestruck looks when they find out this American even knows who Stephen Harper is.

    My partner and I both found employment right away, and so did almost every other US-to-Canada immigrant we know.

    And that's in Toronto where the economy is depressed thanks in large part to the Bush administration's gross mishandling of the U.S. economy. As I said, western Canada is enjoying boom times with negative unemployment in places.

    The other concern is more general, about the lengthy application process, and my advice is more general life advice. It might not work for you, but it did work for me, so for what it's worth, I will share it.

    There are ways around that now, by the way. Any prospective immigrants are encouraged to check into each province's Provincial Nominee Program. If you go the PNP route, you get your initial evaluation in weeks, not months, and you get the green light in months, not years. You can also get a work permit as soon as you're nominated and not have to go through the torturous Labour Market Opinion process.

    I know the application process is very daunting, even overwhelming. There were certainly times I felt overwhelmed - and everyone I know who has emigrated here felt the same way. Try to remember, as with any process: one step at a time. Make it your mantra.

    Also, don't forget that it's designed for regular people to be able to complete. It's not set up so that you have to be a lawyer to understand it.

    First, read everything on the CIC site, finding what pertains to you and digesting that material. Only that. Not too much more.

    Then read it again. And again. Did I mention the importance of reading it again?

    For those of you applying under the Skilled Worker program, this is an excellent resource. It's the manual CIC uses internally to process the applications.

    Just my $0.02 worth. (That's what, a buck U.S. now, eh?)

    L-girl said...

    M Yass, thank you for your affirmation!

    Flat-out wrong is most often the case, I found. I've had people on various U.S.-to-Canada immigration sites swear up, down and sideways that you can be refused for having bad credit. Uhh . . . a cursory glance at the form will tell you that's not the case. It doesn't even ask about credit issues.

    I hear that a lot about medical issues, too. People tell other people that they can be rejected for medical reasons - but they cannot.

    Not only that, I've found that Canadians can laugh at themselves a lot more than Americans can.

    Laughing at themselves (ourselves?) is a hallmark of Canadianism.

    Most of the Canadians I've met smile and nod understandingly when I tell them I'm an American who just moved to Canada.

    We heard it all the time when we first got here - at the bank, the car dealership, at the corner store. Nothing but "welcome to Canada" and "we understand".

    redsock said...

    Quite honestly, I sometimes suspect that anti-immigrant types deliberately post disinformation to those forums as part of some perverted crusade to dissuade applicants.

    DING DING DING!!!

    We have a winner.

    ...

    (and people of that ilk pollute all types of online forums)

    M. Yass said...

    I hear that a lot about medical issues, too. People tell other people that they can be rejected for medical reasons - but they cannot.

    I know the SCC has ruled that a person cannot be refused for having HIV/AIDS or for having autistic children. I also know that people won't be refused for ordinary medical problems such as diabetes and high blood pressure. Still, the regulation is there and presumably for a reason. I have a hard time believing they would let someone in who had a condition that was legitimately a threat to public health (active TB comes to mind).

    If you could see your way clear to point me to one or more of the posts about the medical issue, I'd be only too happy.

    L-girl said...

    The medical screening, as far as anyone can tell, is a relic from another time. It's more like an exercise or a rubber stamp. As you said, no one is excluded for every day health issues. Especially since immigration is weighted to the slightly older set (when you would have the necessary work experience and money to emigrate), most people are going to have some health issues by that time.

    Infectious diseases are another story, but the person might still be admitted with a health warning. After all, people with valid passports travel all over the world, and no one checks their health.

    I've also heard from lawyers who work with refugees that if there are many grounds for exclusion, health can be be part of the overall picture. But an application that would otherwise be accepted can't be excluded on health reasons alone.

    If you could see your way clear to point me to one or more of the posts about the medical issue, I'd be only too happy.

    Do you mean on immigration forums? I wouldn't know where to begin. I don't have anything bookmarked, haven't looked at them in ages. I'm basing my comments on what people who have emailed me have told me that they've heard. If that makes sense!

    Lone Primate said...

    I'm always glad when educated, progressive people move here from the US. We need them (we need such people from everywhere, the truth be told). But for all the bad news from the States, we have to be humble enough to admit that mythology and money still go a long, long way. The last figures I saw had just under 12,000 folks from the States move here in either 2006 or 2007... but in the same time period, about 23,000 of us moved down there. Admittedly that's down from about 30,000 a few years ago, but still... that southward pull is powerful. Powerful.

    If I may offer my two cents, I'd counsel folks moving here not to abandon their citizenship. There's nothing in Canadian or US law that requires it when acquiring Canadian citizenship. I realize it's a potent symbol of washing one's hands, but you never know what the future holds. It's not impossible that Canada might one day take a turn you don't like, while the US could get back on track. You might have other reasons or needs to go back. I think it's it good idea to keep your options open.

    M. Yass said...

    The medical screening, as far as anyone can tell, is a relic from another time. It's more like an exercise or a rubber stamp. As you said, no one is excluded for every day health issues. Especially since immigration is weighted to the slightly older set (when you would have the necessary work experience and money to emigrate), most people are going to have some health issues by that time.

    From reading Dan & Alan over at WBC's account, it sounded like it ended up being more like a thorough checkup. "Oh, we found a couple of things, so we're going to send you for more tests (on our nickel) to make sure you're aware of it and that you have it under control."

    How terrible, huh?

    Infectious diseases are another story, but the person might still be admitted with a health warning.

    I hear TB is one issue they are very sensitive to.

    Do you mean on immigration forums?

    No, I meant on your great, but very voluminous blog. ;)

    M. Yass said...

    Lone Primate said...

    we have to be humble enough to admit that mythology and money still go a long, long way.


    The money is part of the mythology. I'm making more of it here than I ever did in the States. Teachers up here start at around $50K a year rather than $30K in my home state of Washington. And from what I understand, the idea that taxes are a lot lower in the States is also largely a myth. We haven't even started talking about health care yet . . .

    If I may offer my two cents, I'd counsel folks moving here not to abandon their citizenship.

    I'm not going to. There's something really, really gratifying about being able to say, "you know what, I despise you and everything you stand for to the point that I've voted with my feet . . . but you still have to afford me all of the right and benefits of citizenship."

    There's nothing in Canadian or US law that requires it when acquiring Canadian citizenship. I realize it's a potent symbol of washing one's hands, but you never know what the future holds. It's not impossible that Canada might one day take a turn you don't like, while the US could get back on track.

    Always possible, yes. Seems extremely unlikely right now, but it's always possible.

    You might have other reasons or needs to go back. I think it's it good idea to keep your options open.

    Well, for me, my mum lives in the States, so I want to be able to go see her unimpeded. And unimpeded cross-border shopping is attractive.

    L-girl said...

    I do think the US is beyond hope, but I also agree with Lone Primate that it might be smarter to keep my options open. Like M Yass - and many of the moving-to-Canada crew - I have family and friends that I love in the US, including my mother, and I want to be able to travel freely. So hanging on to citizenship might be smart.

    But there are times, when I think about the war, or what I just posted about incarcerated children, that I want to march into the US consulate with my passport and a match.

    L-girl said...

    No, I meant on your great, but very voluminous blog. ;)

    Oh, that. :)

    M. Yass said...

    I do think the US is beyond hope . . .

    I tend to agree, sadly. I've been deluged with messages of hope from my Obamiac friends in the States. They all tell me their guy is going to deliver "big change." They also take issue with my belief that the U.S. is not a civilized country because it does not have universal health care.

    My stock answer is this: When you can (gasp) get sick in the U.S. and not worry about whether you can get treatment for it, much less how you're going to pay for said treatment, I'll listen to you tell me about this "civilized" country you live in. Until then, I'll just be happy that I now live in the civilized world.

    Alex said...

    Not to boost L-Girl's ego any - but this site was the best resource I had when completing my application for Permanent Resident status.

    Like she says -

    * Read everything on the CIC site.
    * Read everything on the CIC again.
    * Make lists, double check. If you have questions for CIC - Fax them in. They respond to faxes quickly (less than a week) and then you have certified, stamped proof of the answer you were given.
    * Be patient - it took two years for my application - but it is worth it to be on my way to citizenship here in Canada!

    ErinOrtlund said...

    You know how US expats have to file US taxes every year? My understanding is that if you renounce your US citizenship, you still have to file US taxes for 10 years. Not sure if that's true.

    I wouldn't say the provincial nominee programs take weeks. We applied in August to the Saskatchewan Immigrant Nominee Program. And we just got notified of our nomination this week (April). That nomination is good for 6 months, so yes, I am stressed out as we are one of those couples who need criminal checks from numerous states, and 3 different countries. Thanks for the advice to take it one step at a time! I figure I'll concentrate on applying for our international criminal checks first.

    About the medical exam, will they need to examine my 3 year old daughter as well? Our son was born here, so he's a Canadian citizen--I assume we just note that on our application but he won't need a medical check?

    L-girl said...

    My understanding is that if you renounce your US citizenship, you still have to file US taxes for 10 years.

    I don't see how that could be true. But I don't know for sure. I do know there is A LOT of misinformation about citizenship and taxes. I wouldn't trust anything I didn't see from the IRS itself.

    I'm sorry, I don't know the answer to your medical exam question.

    ErinOrtlund said...

    http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/international/article/0,,id=97245,00.html

    It looks like the rules are different for people depending on whether people expatriated before or after June 2004.

    ErinOrtlund said...

    http://www.irs.gov/irb/2007-14_IRB/ar16.html

    Here's something else I found. I don't really understand it or who exactly it applies to. But if I were thinking of renouncing my US citizenship, especially if I was a high earner, I'd try to find out exactly how this would affect me.

    L-girl said...

    Thanks for the links, Erin.

    I do know that of everyone I know who was born in the US and is now a Canadian citizen, no one files with the IRS anymore. Not one person. And they all travel back and forth freely between the two countries.

    None of them have a very high income, but then, neither do I.

    But it's important to know where you stand before making a decision - so thank you!

    ErinOrtlund said...

    That's interesting--I know US citizens are supposed to be filing taxes every year, but I have wondered what the consequences might be--I wonder if there woud be an issue should any of your friends try to repatriate?

    Another thing to keep in mind, especially for expats with kids, is that if you don't file US taxes, you may be missing out on some available tax credits.

    Anyway, thanks again for a great blog!

    L-girl said...

    I can promise you none of them will ever repatriate. They've been in Canada more than 40 years. They are thoroughly Canadian.

    ErinOrtlund said...

    That's good! I do think that if a US citizen wants to settle with a foreign spouse in the US (sponsor them for US permanent residency), part of that process does involve showing US tax returns for the past 3 years.

    No relevance to your friends but could be to someone else.

    lovesick21 said...

    Hi I am a 21 yrd old female born and raised in the u.s. my fiance had to leave me about a month ago to establish his residency in canada. (he is making a refugee claim) I would like to know what is the quickest way to get to canada can i just apply on the cic website for a work permit and residence card? Or is there a better route. I really miss him and we have a daughter together. I have just got my associates in Social Work and will hopeful pursue a career in nursing. Please help i am very love sick and child care expenses are killing me on my one income and i have no family where i am as well

    L-girl said...

    Lovesick21, you can email me if you want. Meanwhile, read up on the CIC site and see what you might qualify for. Permanent Residency takes years to get and is expensive, too. But email me, we can talk about it.

    Borges said...

    Québec is not the paradise for immigrants that you describe, although it is hardly the Deep South. Just my own experiences as an immigrant, though not of US origin.

    ASHANTI said...

    hI LAURA
    IT HAS BEEN A LONG TIME DREAM TO RE LOCATE TO CANADA ,HAVING COME UP ON YOUR STORY IM ALL ITCHY FEET AGAIN HOWEVER IVE NOTICE THAT IT ALL ABOUT AMERICANS WANTING TO MOVE THERE IS IT THE SAME PROCESS FOR SOME ONE COMING FROM THE UK I WOULD WELCOME YOUR COMENT ALSO IS THERE ANY REASON WHY ONE CANT APPLY FROM WITHIN IF YOU ARE THERE ALREADY!!!!!!!!?

    L-girl said...

    Ashanti, I'm going to assume the ALL CAPS was a mistake and reply.

    IS IT THE SAME PROCESS FOR SOME ONE COMING FROM THE UK

    The process to emigrate to Canada is the same no matter where you come from. Some countries might take longer to process police checks and such, and in some countries or regions CIC offices may be more or less helpful. But the process is the same.

    IS THERE ANY REASON WHY ONE CANT APPLY FROM WITHIN IF YOU ARE THERE ALREADY!!!!!!!!?

    If you are living in Canada on a temporary resident visa, you can apply for permanent residence through the new "Canadian experience" class. That is relatively new.

    But that means you have already applied for and received temporary resident status. For that you need arranged employment - proof of a job waiting for you in Canada.

    When you say "if you are there already", I'm not sure what you mean. If a person is in Canada illegally and has no status, no, she cannot apply for PR status from within Canada.

    If the person is already in Canada through some other legal status, then the CIC website should be able to answer your question.

    In the future, please turn off the ALL CAPS before commenting. Thank you.

    Truth be told.. said...

    Your Blog is kind a blessing for me or the advice that you get from your very close mentor. I'm moving to Vancouver,BC from Los Angeles, CA, this Monday...I know.. very much desperate for your advice. I visited Vancouver Last year loved it so much. But since I got my Immigration my friends are convincing me to stay here and "eventually" I will get the job. but I want to live in peace with my environment by working for good employer. I hope my move turns out to be a lucky one for me as I have high hopes from my adopted country. Just afraid of the negative experiences people have. I will keep posting my experiences regularly and get your advice. Thanks.

    L-girl said...

    Truth be told, thank you for your comment. I'm very happy my blog has helped you in any way.

    But since I got my Immigration my friends are convincing me to stay here and "eventually" I will get the job.

    I don't know what this means. You "got your immigration" - do you mean you have status in Canada? Are you waiting for a job in L.A. or Vancouver?

    I will keep posting my experiences regularly and get your advice.

    I assume you mean you will be posting your experiences on your own blog, not here! Your link doesn't seem to be an immigration blog.

    Feel free to come back and clarify if you wish. Best of luck on the move and in Vancouver.

    L-girl said...

    Québec is not the paradise for immigrants that you describe

    Where on this blog is Quebec described as a paradise for immigrants?