12.20.2007

i hate christmas

Only five more days.

Only five more days of "Have you finished all your shopping?" and "What are you doing for Christmas?" and listening to the long litany of what my co-workers got for people I don't know and will never meet. Only five more days of this most irritating and pervasive assumption that I celebrate this holiday, because doesn't everybody? Only five more days, and sometimes I think I will explode before I get there.

As with so many things, it's less in Canada than in the US. It's lower-key here, and it starts later. And thank goodness for that, because my tolerance for this Christmas bullshit is decreasing every year. When I was younger I used to like to see the windows on Fifth Avenue (a popular New York tourist attraction) and St. Patrick's Cathedral in its Christmas finery. But after you've done that a half-dozen times or so, the attraction wanes, then disappears.

I'm grateful I've always lived in a place where I can say, "I don't celebrate Christmas," without seeming like a freak. In New York City, now in the GTA, lots of people don't celebrate Christmas. Even so, people may be somewhat startled when you say it. Sometimes they'll stammer, "I just meant the holidays in general". I'll play along to be polite, but you know what? There are no "holidays in general". Christmas is a religious holiday and if you aren't Christian, it has absolutely no meaning. I understand that some non-Christians have adopted Christmas as some type of secular ritual, but I can't understand why. No one has adopted Yom Kippur or Eid or Ramadan - or Easter - that way.

Despite these feelings, I do participate in some ways. If I have your email address, you've probably received a card from us. Some years we've spent quite a lot of time and effort making our own card, and we enjoyed that. We make some donations, we give some end-of-year tips for services, and we buy a few presents, some obligatory, others out of appreciation. I do use this time of year as a time for those kinds of acknowledgements. It's easier than being truly eccentric and doing that in, say, February.

But it's a bare minimum. Mostly I just wish it would all go away, and the sooner, the better.

60 comments:

John said...

I am unimpressed with the commercial trappings of Christmas. I'm also not a religious person. Yet I do celebrate the holiday to the extent that I exchange gifts with family and send out cards.

Your post has made me wonder why I do this. My family was not religious; we certainly didn't go to midnight mass or anything of the sort.

After some thought, I've decided that it's a sort of memorial act. I remember how I felt about Christmas as a child.

I was excited by the prospect of Santa's visit (he was my religious figure, I suppose), by the festive transformation of the house and the city, and by the prospect of waking up to presents.

Obviously, I'm not the same person I was as a child. I will never again have that intense, magical realist view of the season. But I remember that vanished child with fondness, and my low-key celebration of Christmas continues.

L-girl said...

But I remember that vanished child with fondness, and my low-key celebration of Christmas continues.

Thanks for your comment.

That's an interesting idea, and it makes sense in your context. (Not that your holidays have to make sense to me, they only have to make sense to you.)

Neither my partner nor I grew up celebrating Christmas, so anything we do is just succumbing to social pressure. I hate doing it... yet there I am.

James said...

Lori & I enjoy the family part of Christmas, but that's about it. We do have one tradition, though: we collect unChristmas carols: songs about how annoying Christmas is.

Some classics:

The Night Santa Went Crazy by "Weird" Al Yankovic
Santa 's Coming And He's Gonna Kick Your Ass by The Arrogant Worms
What if Eminem Wrote Jingle Bells? by Bob Rivers
F*** Christmas by Eric Idle
Hanukkah in Santa Monica by Tom Lehrer (Unfortunately, YouTube did not have Lehrer performing his classic Christmas Carol)

L-girl said...

We do have one tradition, though: we collect unChristmas carols: songs about how annoying Christmas is.

A fine tradition! Great songs, I will listen to the ones I haven't heard yet.

I do like many non-traditional holiday songs. My list is here.

I absolutely loathe most of the standard commercial Christmas songs. I try to get through as much of this season without hearing them as humanly possible.

James said...

Here's an ok rendition of Tom Lehrer's "Christmas Carol" -- not nearly as good as the original, but the only other ones I could find were presented by Christopher Hitchens, who just can't sing...

Ferdzy said...

He. I DO celebrate christmas, but I could definitely do without it, especially this year when we have just finished being sick for three weeks, took a week break and look like getting sick again.

There are no kids in our family, and both sets of parents are divorced. Fortunately, half of them feel as we do, and while we usually get together with them for some kind of festive meal, that's about it. The other two parents, though, still think christmas should be a Very Big Deal, so we all line up and humour them. The negotiations over who gets actual christmas day and who has to settle for christmas eve or boxing day can get intense.

It could be worse - the first year K and I were together, we had 5 christmas dinners (4 parents and an uncle; not all on one day thank goodness) and swore we would never do that again.

I used to enjoy Christmas a lot more. As a kid of course, but even as a young adult. I never paid much attention to the religious aspects of it, or at least not the christian religious aspects; it was the old pagan parts that appealed to me as much for their historical continuity as anything. I might enjoy it again if I could be let to skip it for a couple of years.

I did get your card, thank you very much! :D

I have to say though, I always feel mildly guilty when I get cards because I have just never been organized enough to do them myself.

I hope you and Alan can at least get some sort of pause over the changing of the year, relax a bit and get a break from work.

L-girl said...

Thanks for this nice comment, Ferdzy. :)

I'm glad your celebration has calmed down to more tolerable levels! And you're welcome, and no guilt necessary.

I hope you and Alan can at least get some sort of pause over the changing of the year, relax a bit and get a break from work

We do mark the New Year, and we have our anniversary on Jan 3, and save all our real celebrating for that.

You reminded me of one more thing I do like: for the first time, we get paid for days we don't work! Xmas, Boxing Day and New Year's Day, times two, making quite a nice bonus to put towards the Vacation Fund.

Scott M. said...

There are no "holidays in general". Christmas is a religious holiday and if you aren't Christian, it has absolutely no meaning.

Hmm. I don't know about that. Easter has become hide-and-seek and-chocolates-day, St. Valentines Day has become fancy-dinner-with-your-sweetum day, Thanksgiving has become family-get-together day, Haloween has become candy day, St. Patrick's day has become green-beer-and-underwear-day and Christmas has become green-tree-with-presents-delivered-by-Santa day.

All of these things were based on religious holidays.

Our common culture has co-opted all of these days and people now celebrate them as secular holidays. And to me, that's OK. If you want to celebrate Christmas as a non-Christian holiday, go for it. Many of my non-Christian friends celebrate it.

Of course if you choose not to, that's fine too. But, perhaps unfortunately, it can hardly be called a Christian holiday anymore.

PeterC said...

There are two things I dislike about this season.

First are the automatic assumptions; ranging from having to fend off the charity guy at work, to being told how Jesus would celebrate so I could be more Christian. It reminds me of the assumption that, of course, I'm going to have children the question is just when. Bah and Humbug!

Second, BUY BUY BUY! That new dept. store comercial where "Giving is the thing." Riiight, I thought "profit was the thing". Families, even at family gatherings often seem to place a poor second to the doing and the buying.
Anyhow, my wife and I do "celebrate" the year by taking stock of the last year, sharing a little bit of our wealth with others, and having an anniversary. I think it just grew out of childhood memories. It is also important to me because it is the solstice. (I find the wife and I look forward at the summer solstice, and back in the winter)

Loved the links for the unchristmas songs. I think I had them all except F*** Christmas and they will soon be all added to my iPOD. :)

Amy said...

As a Jew, I always find this time of year somewhat difficult. I also hate the assumption that this is my holiday (or that Hanukkah is my VERSION of Christmas). I resent the fact that on commercial radio they play NOTHING but Christmas music---starting at Thanksgiving this year. I resent the fact that TV is inundated with Christmas specials. Sometimes I just mutter, "Don't be a Scrooge---people love this, just tolerate it, and shut up and let them wish you a merry Christmas." Bah, humbug.

BUT what I truly resent the most is that our government and our politicians treat this as a national holiday---that our public places have Christmas trees and songs, that the f--ing candidates for office have to make commercials with Christmas trees in the background. What the hell happened to the First Amendment?

Anyway, happy winter solstice, everyone, and may the next year be filled with peace and light.

James said...

St. Patrick's day has become green-beer-and-underwear-day

I read recently that St. Patrick's day was a very minor event in Ireland until fairly recently (i.e. the last couple of decades at most), when someone in the gov't realized it could be a tourism booster. Since then, it's gone the way of every other marketable holiday.

I like some of the alternate versions of Christmas out there: Newtonmas, for physicists, celebrates the birthday of Sir Isaac Newton (born Dec. 25th); Squidmas, for marine biologists; Festivus, for Seinfeld fans; whatever name the Pastafarians have settled on, for Pastafarians; etc.

And, as Phil Plait (the Bad Astronomer) says, "The inclination of the Earth's axis to it's orbit around the Sun is the reason for the season!"

Oh, and one more song:
Christma-Hanu-Rama-Ka-Dona-Kwanzaa" by Roy Zimmerman

Nigel Patel said...

I've generally gone-along-to-get-along because I'm really a go-along-to-get-along kind of guy. (secretly I truly think people and society in general are absolutely the Bees Knees) but I've cleverly slipped out of the whole Xmas extravaganza with a Poverty Exemption.
And with a second year of it I think I've wriggled out of the tradition altogether.
I'll still show up and eat all the free food and hug people but it looks like I've gotten away with stepping out of the Big Cultural Toystore.

Btw: one of the coolest things about living in Canada has to be the short untied-to-the-calendar Parliamentary Elections.
The 2008 November Election has been chugging strong for nearly an entire sickening year.

James said...

One of the coolest things about living in Canada has to be the short untied-to-the-calendar Parliamentary Elections.

The more I watch US elections, the more I appreciate the fact that we never have election campaigns that last longer than a few months up here.

As some blogger I read (don't remember which one) pointed out, in the US there's only one year in four that's not an election year of some sort -- the year after a Presidential election. The rest of the time, there are campaigns going on.

M@ said...

I hate a lot about the Xmas season as well -- and the worst of it ties in with your feelings about advertising, L.

In recent years, SuMei and I have often booked holidays near or over Xmas. It worked well for us, but I think our families were somewhat unhappy. Their happiness, though, was not a major factor in the decision.

But the most important seasonal thing for me is that SuMei and I decided to get married on Christmas Eve, and among all the other silliness in the holiday season, that is at least one important seasonal event I can look forward to.

West End Bound said...

Thanks for the card, L-Girl.

The children's picture was GREAT!

L-girl said...

I also hate the assumption that this is my holiday (or that Hanukkah is my VERSION of Christmas).

Me too!!!!!

I resent the fact that on commercial radio they play NOTHING but Christmas music---starting at Thanksgiving this year. I resent the fact that TV is inundated with Christmas specials.

Me too me too.

BUT what I truly resent the most is that our government and our politicians treat this as a national holiday---that our public places have Christmas trees and songs, that the f--ing candidates for office have to make commercials with Christmas trees in the background. What the hell happened to the First Amendment?

ME TOO!!!!

To me, the Christmas tree on the White House lawn has always been a symbol of my alienation from the US. Even before I could articulate it that way, I felt it meant I didn't truly belong.

Thanks, Amy. :)

L-girl said...

Easter has become hide-and-seek and-chocolates-day

I have never met or heard of a non-Christian person who celebrates Easter in any way, shape or form.

Likewise, in my lifetime there has never been a religious component (in the US) to Thanksgiving, Halloween, St Patrick's Day, or Valentine's Day, and among those, Thanksgiving is the only one I've ever celebrated.

Our common culture has co-opted all of these days and people now celebrate them as secular holidays.

When Christmas contains no references to Jesus, no mangers, no creche scenes, no prayers, no churches, no Mass, no songs that include the words "our saviour" "Christ is born" or the like, then it will be a secular holiday.

I realize lots of non-Christians celebrate Christmas. That is a not a positive thing, in my opinion. I cannot imagine why I would want to do that.

L-girl said...

First are the automatic assumptions; ranging from having to fend off the charity guy at work, to being told how Jesus would celebrate so I could be more Christian. It reminds me of the assumption that, of course, I'm going to have children the question is just when. Bah and Humbug!

This doesn't sound toooo familiar. ;-)

Second, BUY BUY BUY!

Yes yes yes. Go away away away, ads ads ads.

Thanks Peter C, I wholeheartedly agree.

L-girl said...

I hate a lot about the Xmas season as well -- and the worst of it ties in with your feelings about advertising, L.

It all works together, doesn't it? All part of the Evil Plan To Drive Me Insane.

But the most important seasonal thing for me is that SuMei and I decided to get married on Christmas Eve, and among all the other silliness in the holiday season, that is at least one important seasonal event I can look forward to.

Oh, lovely! Anniversaries are wonderful. Enjoy!

James said...

I have never met or heard of a non-Christian person who celebrates Easter in any way, shape or form.

Lori & I often "celebrate" by getting each other chocolate bunnies or some such, though it's more from force of habit than anything.

The big irony with Easter is that it should be (and used to be) the biggest Christian holy day. Until late Victorian times, Christmas was a non-event (notice how the butcher shop was open on Christmas Day in A Christmas Carol), and Easter was much more significant theologically. Some of the early, religiously-based American colonies banned the celebration of Christmas because of its pagan roots.

And nowadays, we have Bill O'Reilly comparing people who say "Happy Holidays" to the Taliban (literally).

L-girl said...

I read recently that St. Patrick's day was a very minor event in Ireland until fairly recently

The Irish people I've met (Irish - not Irish-Americans) either have it as a religious holiday, or not at all. (Lots of Irish people are not Catholic.)

I have no doubt Irish tourism exploits it for the public-drunkness crowd, but I doubt there's many Irish among them.

L-girl said...

Lori & I often "celebrate" by getting each other chocolate bunnies or some such, though it's more from force of habit than anything.

At least you were both raised Christian, at least nominally so. I know plenty of non-Christians who celebrate Christmas, but no one who acts like Easter is secular. Maybe they're out there somewhere, but I've never met one. And there's certainly no social pressure to acknowledge Easter as there is Christmas.

The big irony with Easter is that it should be (and used to be) the biggest Christian holy day.

As any good ex-fundie will tell you. Just ask Allan. :)

One benefit of the wingnuts' "who killed Christmas" campaign is it's taught a lot of people about Christmas's pagan roots.

Sarah said...

To follow up on James and l-girls comments re: Easter as the once-holiest Christian holiday.

Anyone who has spent time in Latin America (more precisely, Central America & Caribbean, can't speak to Mexico or S. America) will have encountered the "Semana Santa" ("Holy Week", the week preceding Easter) phenomenon, namely about the un-holiest week you can imagine: an excuse for a week-long party with lots of booze and debauchery. The closest thing I saw to "santa" was in Panama, where liquor sales were prohibited as of noon on the Thursday and things were a bit more family-oriented.

I've been trying to get my (non-Christian) family to do away with Christmas for years, to no avail. I go along with it only because it does force a gathering, but WHY can't we do it some other time of year, when the weather is better (said gatherings happening in Central Illinois) and travel isn't so nuts??

Thanks for affirming me in my Grinchiscroogeness.

Nigel Patel said...

Ah Easter.
Never celebrated it as such but as a Candy Holiday it beats Halloween (one of my favorite days even before I heard the term The Broom Closet) hands down.
Let them have their holy zombie day all they want I'll take the chocolate bunnies and Cadbury eggs.

Amy said...

When Christmas contains no references to Jesus, no mangers, no creche scenes, no prayers, no churches, no Mass, no songs that include the words "our saviour" "Christ is born" or the like, then it will be a secular holiday.

Amen to that. I have this argument often when people at work claim we don't celebrate "religious" holidays, yet we are always closed for Christmas, our whole fall calendar is based on when Christmas falls, and we have a huge "holiday" party where there are Christmas decorations everywhere. If celebrating the birth of "the Savior" is not religious, then I don't know what is. And if I were a Christian, I would find it very offensive when people say Christmas is not a religious holiday.

As for Easter, my experience is the same as Laura's----I know and have known Jews and other non-Christians who celebrate Christmas in some way, but not Easter. Somehow Easter is less commercialized and its essential religious meaning---celebrating the resurrection of Christ---is harder to ignore and harder to swallow if you are not a Christian.

L-girl said...

Sarah, you're welcome, happy to help!

Amy, more thank yous and more ME TOOs.

And Nige, what is up with needing an excuse to eat candy? Candy is available every day and can be consumed 365 days each year. Even in Michigan, I am told.

redsock said...

an excuse for a week-long party with lots of booze and debauchery

Last year I was reading a book on the ways Xmas was celebrated through the decades and enjoyed learning about the massive partying and rioting that went on in the 1800s.

Gangs of poor people would roam through town and show up at the houses of the well-to-do and demand to be given food. Or else.

Maybe I can get L to post some excerpts on the 25th.

L-girl said...

"Semana Santa" ("Holy Week", the week preceding Easter) phenomenon, namely about the un-holiest week you can imagine

Many people forget that's what Mardi Gras / Carnival was supposed to be - getting all the pleasure in before giving it all up for Lent. It's not surprising one part of the tradition took off and the other wilted.

Maybe I can get L to post some excerpts on the 25th.

Remind me.

redsock said...

Times of London:

"The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams, dismissed the Christmas story of the Three Wise Men yesterday as nothing but "legend."

There was scant evidence for the Magi, and none at all that there were three of them, or that they were kings, he said."

*******

Bill O'Reilly's head just exploded.

(P.S. Why does the Archbishop hate America?)

L-girl said...

(P.S. Why does the Archbishop hate America?)

Liberal media again?

redsock said...

Off-topic!

I was looking through the book I referred to above -- "The Battle for Christmas" by Stephen Nissenbaum -- and found a piece of paper that I may have used as a bookmark.

On it, I have written a quote from Johnny Mercer, who after seeing a particularly bad musical in the mid-1970s, remarked: "I could eat alphabet soup and shit better lyrics."

That's funny stuff!

Ferdzy said...

Well, back from baking 4 different kinds of cookies (from one recipe!) and ginger pound cake. Yay, progress.

And in two more days, it will be the REAL "reason for the season" as far as I am concerned - solstice! Longer days, definitely worth celebrating.

Cookie, anyone?

impudent strumpet said...

The commercialism doesn't actually bother me. It probably should, but it doesn't. (Although the omnipresence of xmas when I'm trying to do my normal commercialism pisses me off - I'm just buying toilet paper! I don't need to hear the little drummer boy!) It's kind of annoying that the one thing that gets my entire extended family together is a religious holiday in a religion that I don't believe in but they do, because I have a herd of cousins who become more and more fascinating each year and I like catching up with them, but I don't like having to give the appearance of celebrating a religious thing to do so. I wish I could wear a disclaimer.

But the most annoying thing is that it's supposed to be a Happy Joyous Occasion! You're supposed to Celebrate! It's too much fucking pressure! And it's omnipresent from Halloween - "OMG, we're all going to be so HAPPY! Get ready!" Nothing can live up to that!

the first year K and I were together, we had 5 christmas dinners (4 parents and an uncle; not all on one day thank goodness) and swore we would never do that again

Mi cielito and I don't even try - we both handle our own families and regroup for new year's. My sister's still trying to do everything in both families, but i don't know how long she'll be able to keep that up.

And nowadays, we have Bill O'Reilly comparing people who say "Happy Holidays" to the Taliban (literally).

I wonder what he'd think about people like me, who say things like "Good morning" and "Have a nice day"?

Gangs of poor people would roam through town and show up at the houses of the well-to-do and demand to be given food. Or else.

I want to do that! Trickertreat on xmas and when people ask why give them a pamphlet explaining the history.

And in two more days, it will be the REAL "reason for the season" as far as I am concerned - solstice!

Which is also Global Orgasm Day.

Jen said...

re: "Semana Santa" ("Holy Week", the week preceding Easter) phenomenon, namely about the un-holiest week you can imagine"

re: "Many people forget that's what Mardi Gras / Carnival was supposed to be - getting all the pleasure in before giving it all up for Lent. It's not surprising one part of the tradition took off and the other wilted."


Yeah, I was wondering if that's what Sarah was Sarah was refering too originally. If so then Mardi Gras/Shrove Tues is 40 long fun-free, fish-filled days before Easter, not the week before. 'Tho in english Holy week is the week of Easter (Ash Wed, Holy Thurs, Good Fri, Holy Sat, Easter Sun, Holy Cow) but around my house growing up that just meant more fish and less fun than the preceeding 35 days.

Jen, recovering Catholic

David Cho said...

I so agree with you. I am a Christian, and I hate Christmas.

No, it is not because of the "it has been so secularized" BS. The holiday itself has little religious or historic basis. Jesus was not born on December 25th. The origin of the holiday is thoroughly pagan, and now it is a commercial fest.

PS: Thank you for the card :)

mister anchovy said...

Santa Claus, like the Easter Bunny, are no very religious. I don't get too very excited about Christmas, but I will say that it provides an opportunity for our family to gather, enjoy a feast together, maybe play a little music, tell some stories. Sometimes getting the whole family together is challenging, but at Christmas it happens, and I think that would be a good thing, no matter what you call it, or the history of the occasion.

Jen said...

It occurred to me that Ash Wed is immediately after Shrove Tues... I just liked to lump all fish days together... like a fish cake >>shuddering at memory<<

Amy said...

Mister Anchovy, I don't think anyone here is objecting to families willingly getting together, sharing time and memories. I think what people are objecting to is the commercialism of the holiday and the fact that it is forced down our throats, whether we are part of the Christian population or not, whether we want to celebrate it or not. There is no other holiday, reigious or secular, that consumes as much of our time, air waves, culture, etc., as Christmas. All religions and ethnic groups have holidays where families get together---Jews, for example, have Rosh Hashanah and Passover as two major holidays where families get together for feasts and celebration. But you don't see weeks and weeks of commercials, songs, TV movies, decorations, etc., overwhelming the entire culture and assuming that everyone in it wants to celebrate those holidays.

L-girl said...

Mr Anchovy, thanks for your thoughts, it's always good to see you here.

but I will say that it provides an opportunity for our family to gather, enjoy a feast together, maybe play a little music, tell some stories.

That's great for your family if it happens on Christmas. For my family, it used to happen on Passover or Rosh Ha'Shanah. I didn't expect non-Jewish families to get together on those days. But almost everyone I know or have ever met expects that my family will get together on Christmas, and is often bothered - even offended! - that they do not.

I think that would be a good thing, no matter what you call it, or the history of the occasion.

It's a good thing for your family if it's part of your tradition. But why would it be a good thing to use a holiday that has absolutely zero meaning as an excuse to get together with family? My family should get together according to its own customs and traditions.

For many of us, Christmas is just another day. I don't shove Passover at Christians, even Americans don't shove US Thanksgiving at Canadians. But Christmas is shoved on all of us, whether we like it or not.

L-girl said...

I so agree with you. I am a Christian, and I hate Christmas.

An issue on which a devout Christian and an atheist Jew can agree. Nice! :)

L-girl said...

Ferdzy, I'll take a cookie. :)

Here's to more daylight, starting now.

L-girl said...

(Although the omnipresence of xmas when I'm trying to do my normal commercialism pisses me off - I'm just buying toilet paper! I don't need to hear the little drummer boy!)

Christ, I hate that.

NPI

But the most annoying thing is that it's supposed to be a Happy Joyous Occasion! You're supposed to Celebrate! It's too much fucking pressure!

That's why I dislike New Year's Eve. Forced hilarity. It seldom works.

L-girl said...

Global Orgasm Day? I must investigate.

James said...

For many of us, Christmas is just another day. I don't shove Passover at Christians, even Americans don't shove US Thanksgiving at Canadians.

Every year I end up explaining, several times, "Thanks, but we had last month." Often to the same people I explained it to last year.

Another non-traditional Xmas song

L-girl said...

Every year I end up explaining, several times, "Thanks, but we had last month."

Many or most Americans don't know Canada has its own Thanksgiving. Unless you know a Canadian or read the small print on certain calendars, you'd never know it. It's not like you hear of it.

My point is that Americans don't try to get people of other nationalities to celebrate that holiday, the way Christians do with Christmas.

Often to the same people I explained it to last year.

No excuse for that! :)

James said...

You might also appreciate the second panel in this NSFW comic.

redsock said...

Nearly 1/3 of Canadians "personally believe" in Santa Claus.

James said...

Global Orgasm Day? I must investigate.

Here you go.

Anonymous said...

Christmas: A day devoted to spending money you don't have on people you don't like to buy them things they don't want, all allegedly to celebrate the non-birth of a non-saviour.

The other thing that gets me is just how people are so fake this time of year. All of this faux cheer and faux friendliness really gets on my nerves.

Merry Fucking Christmas!

Anonymous said...

PS: I swear to god and sonny jesus that if I hear "The Little Drummer Boy" one more time, I'm going to rum-pum-pum-pum on somebody's skull with ball peen hammers!

Well, not really, but that particular carol REALLY gets on my nerves, and I think I've heard like 30 different musical genre versions of it by now.

Once again, Merry Fucking Christmas!

L-girl said...

All of this faux cheer and faux friendliness really gets on my nerves.

I know! Me too.

Well, not really, but that particular carol REALLY gets on my nerves

What is UP with that song? I cannot understand the appeal. I friggin hate it too.

MFC backatcha :)

Anonymous said...

MFC backatcha :)

Thanks! And thank you for the very nice card you sent me with the (furry) kids on it.

As for me, my Canada Day is a week from the day after tomorrow. I have my BC driver's licence and bank account already. All I need now is my SIN card.

L-girl said...

As for me, my Canada Day is a week from the day after tomorrow.

Whoo-hoo! I'm confused, is that Jan 2 or Jan 3?

I have my BC driver's licence and bank account already. All I need now is my SIN card.

Way cool. I'm amazed at how many folks do it this way. We had nothing but our visa. We landed and moved on the same day, then did all the paperwork. These days most folks I hear of do it well in advance.

James said...

Let's not forget the best Christmas carol ever:

Bark us all bow-wows of folly,
Polly wolly cracker 'n' too-da-loo!
Donkey Bonny brays a carol,
Antelope Cantaloupe, 'lope with you!

Hunky Dory's pop is lolly gaggin' on the wagon,
Willy, folly go through!
Chollie's collie barks at Barrow,
Harum scarum five alarm bung-a-loo!

Dunk us all in bowls of barley,
Hinky dinky dink an' polly voo!
Chilly Filly's name is Chollie,
Chollie Filly's jolly chilly view halloo!

Bark us all bow-wows of folly,
Double-bubble, toyland trouble!
Woof, woof, woof!
Tizzy seas on melon collie!
Dibble-dabble, scribble-scrabble!
Goof, goof, goof!


-- Walt Kelly's Pogo

Anonymous said...

And since most of us here are Canadians or would-be Canadians, let's not forget Bob and Doug MacKenzie's incomparable rendition of the Twelve Days of Christmas.

Anonymous said...

L-girl said...

Whoo-hoo! I'm confused, is that Jan 2 or Jan 3?


That would be the third.

Way cool. I'm amazed at how many folks do it this way. We had nothing but our visa. We landed and moved on the same day, then did all the paperwork. These days most folks I hear of do it well in advance.

Keep in mind that I live in Seattle, which is only three hours from the border. The same is true of Would-Be Canadians, Two Moms to Vancouver and a number of our other move-to-Canada blogging group.

I remember you saying NYC is something like 10. It's no biggie for me to pop on up there and get some work done. By contrast, for you to have one day to get stuff done, you're looking at a three-day minimum trip unless you fly.

L-girl said...

Let's not forget the best Christmas carol ever:

That is hilarious and truly bizarre. Of course.

L-girl said...

That would be the third.

The 2nd is the day, one year ago, we moved into this house (which we love).

But the 3rd is an even more auspicious anniversary - the beginning of my and Allan's domestic partnership. Good vibes for you.

Keep in mind that I live in Seattle, which is only three hours from the border. The same is true of Would-Be Canadians, Two Moms to Vancouver and a number of our other move-to-Canada blogging group.

Right. (Two Moms are moving to Frederickton. Moving To Vancouver is probably who you're thinking of.)

Also, folks like Tom and Emilio (Canadian Hope) already knew people through the blogosphere who had made the move before them, so they were able to stay with them, use their address, etc.

Nick and Mason (Life Without Borders) moved from Denver to Toronto, a 30-hour drive, and you can be sure they only did that once.

We really did it the only way we could. I thought we were lucky to be able to come up in advance to look at neighbourhoods, and later to sign a lease, before we moved.

elswhere said...

Hi--I'm very happy to have found this blog, and only wish I'd found it before we moved from Seattle to Vancouver (well, Burnaby) this August! I'm enjoying browsing through your posts.

Have to say, though, that my experience of Canadian Christmas so far is that it started earlier (just after Remembrance Day) and was a bigger and more presumptive deal ("How was your Christmas?") than I'd experienced even in Seattle. For me, Jewish from the East Coast (and with a Jewish kid but non-Jewish spouse) it was a bit hard to take.

But then, we're in a historically Catholic neighborhood here and not in greater Toronto as you are; that could make some of the difference.

L-girl said...

Hi Elswhere! I hope your move north is going well, that you and your family have been happy here so far.

But I'm sorry to hear your Xmas experience is worse here, what a drag.

Welcome to Canada, and welcome to wmtc! All the best.