5.16.2007

the patriotism police

Friends of wmtc have discussed and debated the role of the media in keeping the US public acquiescent in the crimes of its government.

From readers' comments, I've come to soften my hard-line view of the American people as unwitting dupes. Clearly they must bear some responsibility. But I cannot, as some do, blame the people of the United States entirely, as if they are actually in control, as they would be, say, in a democracy.

Here's an item that's been sitting in my inbox for nearly a month, from the terrific blog Attytood, sent to me by Allan. Read it carefully: The Patriotism Police.
Isaacson notes there was "almost a patriotism police" after 9/11 and when the network showed civilian casualties it would get phone calls from advertisers and the administration and "big people in corporations were calling up and saying, 'You're being anti-American here.'"

5 comments:

James said...

And the other police are getting scarier every day:

[Homeland Security Security secretary Michael Chertoff] suggested the Anglo-Saxon legal principle that "it is better that a thousand guilty go unpunished lest one innocent man be wrongly punished" might be outmoded.

From Surveillance state can't monitor itself, says US

L-girl said...

Yes. The other thing I was going to blog about today was Stockwell Day's announcement about "preventive arrests".

M@ said...

the Anglo-Saxon legal principle... might be outmoded.

Like that other Anglo-Saxon legal principle, habeas corpus.

That 4000-year-old book of religious myths and tales, though? As relevant today as ever, right, Mike?

As for Stockwell Day's announcement, I believe I have an MP to write... it's been a while...

L-girl said...

Like that other Anglo-Saxon legal principle, habeas corpus.

That 4000-year-old book of religious myths and tales, though? As relevant today as ever, right, Mike?


Ha! Very good. Now why didn't I think of that?

James said...

Yes. The other thing I was going to blog about today was Stockwell Day's announcement about "preventive arrests".

It's always a bad sign when politicians talk favourably about making the world more like a Philip K. Dick story.