3.27.2007

possibilities

I had two job interviews yesterday, both for positions with the hours I'm looking for.

One firm uses archaic equipment, is in the technological stone age and is obviously tight-fisted with salaries and benefits. They're almost sure to make me an offer, but it doesn't seem like a great place to work.

The other firm seems like a more comfortable work environment, and more competitive, but they're still talking to other people.

Allan thinks I should turn down Cheap Firm regardless of what Better Firm says. It's hard to pass up work when I keep hearing how what I'm looking for (three 12-hour days) is scarcer than ethics in the Bush administration.

Then again, are these positions as rare as everyone thinks? Allan has one, I'm leaving another, and I've already interviewed for two spots, after only two weeks of looking. It's certainly less common than straight Monday-to-Friday positions, but possibly not in the hen's teeth category.

Plus, I'm employed until June 6. I have time.

4 comments:

M. Yass said...

Having worked as a paralegal, I've learned that it really comes down to the personality of the place and the people you work with. This assumes, of course, the firm does not practice in an area that you find morally offensive.

With that in mind, I second Allan's recommendation to keep looking. Now, if you're really hard up for cash, take the job at Cheap Firm and keep looking.

Of course, best of luck either way.

L-girl said...

Thanks for your good wishes.

This assumes, of course, the firm does not practice in an area that you find morally offensive.

Ha! If I did this, I'd have been unemployed or under-employed most of my working life. My last job in NYC was for Baker Botts, as in James Baker. They represent DynaCorp, Halliburton, and other energy interests.

That's what enabled me to work only 24 hours a week, and still be a writer and an activist.

I don't hold my day-job to an ethics test. I figure they're going to be doing the same things whether I'm there or not, I might as well use them if I can.

Having worked as a paralegal, I've learned that it really comes down to the personality of the place and the people you work with.

I guess it's different when you work off-hours. Not being there during normal business hours changes things a lot. All I ask for is good hours, decent pay, a cab home at night, and to be treated decently, not harrassed.

James said...

Then again, are these positions as rare as everyone thinks? Allan has one, I'm leaving another, and I've already interviewed for two spots, after only two weeks of looking.

You're doing better for interviews than I was when I got laid off, so that's a positive sign...

David Cho said...

You should take your time. And working with people stuck in the stone age? That is definitely not for you. I mean, their attitude, not just their technology could be stuck in that age as well.