3.27.2007

great t-shirt

I could have used this when I worked in Rockefeller Center.

Thanks to James for sending me this. Check out some great photos of his puppy.

19 comments:

Tom said...

Cobalt is adorable.

Emilio and I watched the ugliest dog contest on Animal planet. We were laughing our heads off and by the end we wanted to adopt them all.

Mike said...

l-girl: I read this blog post this morning, and I've been thinking about it all day. Also, reread the one from back in 2004 you linked to, with the same basic subject.

I’m an everyday visitor to your site, but don't really like to comment much (if at all!), but I thought I had to write my reaction to this.

This bothers me a little. I can't really pinpoint the reason. Is it because there is a hint of intolerance for people with different travel aspirations as you and me? Maybe. Is it the thought that I've run into people before who have a *my city* attitude before, with distain for people who don't see what they see? Maybe.

I've come to know you in the last few years as a person who stands up for the working person, and who has a progressive view of everything. A breath of fresh air, as opposed to these Democrats in this country that don't stand up for what they believe. However, I just feel in these two posts a hint of anger at people who are maybe not as educated as some of us, not as traveled as some of us, haven't seen a big city like some of us, and are afraid of the big city unlike some of us.

I can understand what you are saying, and I don't question it because I've never lived in a place as tourist ridden like Manhattan. I can't judge what you went through every day like that, and I won't try to.

I have distain for the "love it or leave it..." people in this country, and I can't help to get the sense of the same kind of thing in your blog posts about this subject.

Don't know. I love your blog, your progressiveness and your strong will. I hope my daughter grows up with the same kind of open mind. However, I just needed to express my opinion on this post.

It just bothered me a little on some level.

Jere said...

The only thing I took a little offense to (and I think the shirt is hilarious regardless) is the way the sellers have them hanging there in Brooklyn. Like, "this is the REAL NYC, over here in Brooklyn, go stay over there with thse skyscrapers."

In fact, a non-NYer might have not even noticed this. But I'm just saying, people think they're cooler than me because they live in Williamsburg and have the same haircut and stupid clothes as everyone else there.

As far as the tourists go, I have just as much of a problem with people who live right here in my neighborhood, walking around like they're the only person on the whole sidewalk, paying attention only to whoever they're on the phone with.

I also don't think of NYC as "one" city, but more like hundreds of different neighborhoods. Sure, it'll "unite" in a crisis, just like "America" does, but then we all go back to being our own little section. The South Bronx has nothing to do with Wall Street which has nothing to do with Little Odessa. Just like Rhode Island has nothing to do with the bible belt which has nothing to do with sunny LA.

But I definitely didn't find what Laura said offensive. If people come here, they really should try to see the whole city. Definitely check out the tourist attractions once, but realize that that's only scratching the surface. And don't go to McDonald's. There's just no reason to.

And I can see how they would get annoying. I don't live or work amongst tourists. Every once in a while, though, I'll go to midtown, and it's almost impossible to walk at times.

laura k said...

Mike, thanks for your thoughtful comment, and for sharing your feelings with me.

I can understand you (or anyone) reading that post and being irked by it. I might feel the same way if I read it on someone else's blog.

It's hard to explain what it was like, working in Rockefeller Center, the most heavily touristed spot in the city, during the holiday season. It was like being under seige. I couldn't go outside, because you couldn't walk down the street, the sidewalks were so jammed that no one could move. (I'm not exaggerating.) So I'd be stuck for 12 hours in my office, unable even to go out for coffee.

I couldn't get my regular transportation home because the streets were closed off. It would take me 90 minutes to get home - a trip that was normally 20 minutes. And on and on.

On top of this I felt the tourists I saw didn't like New York or New Yorkers. It seemed they had no interest in discovering New York, but merely observing the strange exotic creatures (we residents) from behind the safety of their groups.

Now this does not describe everyone who visits New York! Not by a long shot. Just many the people who came in large groups and only saw the major tourist attractions. I suppose I do look down on that attitude. It seems narrow-minded and that's not something I can ever admire.

So I guess over time a lot of resentment built up, and that's what was coming out in that post.

In my experience, people who live in places that are heavily visited by tourists do have a love-hate relationship with the tour crowd. We know they're good for the economy and we want them to love our city/town/area, but we resent the crowds, the inconvenience and the disruption that comes along with them.

I hope I don't have anger against someone whose life experiences and aspirations are different than mine, merely because of that. I don't think I do.

But you know, my last years in New York, while we were waiting for our applications to be processed and to leave for Canada, I was very angry - at so many things. Maybe some of that spilled over to people who didn't deserve any of it.

As for the t-shirt, I just thought it was funny and clever. Like "thank you for holding your breath while I smoke" (although I don't smoke and never have).

Maybe that helps. But whether or not it does, thank you for reading wmtc and thanks for the nice things you said here.

Are you the Mike you gave me the idea to change the blog URL? Are you by any chance Mike from Ft Myers Florida, who was so appreciative of my 9/11 piece? Just wondering.

laura k said...

Hey Jere, thanks for that. (We were typing at the same time again!)

As far as the tourists go, I have just as much of a problem with people who live right here in my neighborhood, walking around like they're the only person on the whole sidewalk, paying attention only to whoever they're on the phone with.

Ugh. Definitely. In New York, as in Toronto, as in everywhere. Well, everywhere people walk.

I also don't think of NYC as "one" city, but more like hundreds of different neighborhoods.

Only because it is. :)

I'm not exaggerating about the sidewalks around Rock Ctr. From Thanksgiving weekend to New Year's, I could not go outside.

laura k said...

I hope my daughter grows up with the same kind of open mind.

This is a huge compliment, and I thank you very much for it.

David Cho said...

That dog is amazing looking. The color mix looks so unnatural, but yet it is a very pretty dog.

Mike said...

Mike from www.wmtc.ca fame, yes.

Mike from Florida, no.

laura k said...

Mike from www.wmtc.ca fame, yes.

Oh! I am forever in your debt. :-)

Mike said...

Maybe that helps. But whether or not it does, thank you for reading wmtc and thanks for the nice things you said here.

By no means was I saying that I would stop coming to your site. On the contrary. I just needed to express some feelings on this one particular post that I couldn't get out of my head.

You and Allen keep up the good work with this and JOS.

Why doesn't blogger have spell check on comments? You have fools like me who work with software trying to spell words like "contrary" and have to use MS Word to check myself!! :-)

I'm sure it's not a problem with most bloggers though, like yourself, who have a way with the English Language.

You do good like that. :-)

Mike said...

*Allan

Sorry!

laura k said...

By no means was I saying that I would stop coming to your site. On the contrary.

Thank you - I understood that.

I just needed to express some feelings on this one particular post that I couldn't get out of my head.

I know exactly what you mean. It happens to me frequently.

*Allan

That's the most important word to spell correctly. ;-)

James Redekop said...

Anyone who is immersed in something will have times when they resent those who are "just visiting". Just ask professors how much easier life would be if they could ditch 90% of their students, or computer people if they could ditch 90% of the computer support questions they get. ;)

That dog is amazing looking. The color mix looks so unnatural, but yet it is a very pretty dog.

The colour scheme on Cobalt is called "blue merle", and is one of four Aussie Shepherds come in. The others are "red merle" (similar, but with reds instead of greys), and red and black "tricolour", which have one dominant, solid colour with highlights.

laura k said...

Anyone who is immersed in something will have times when they resent those who are "just visiting".

Good point. That's an interesting way of looking at it. Because in NYC, I loved meeting tourists who were exploring off the beaten track. Or for that matter, just walking anywhere other than midtown and ground zero! Seeing someone, say, in the West Village with a "Time Out New York" guide made me happy, not resentful, and I welcomed their questions.

Canrane said...

And don't go to McDonald's. There's just no reason to.

Delurking briefly to disagree with this. I can actually think of quite a few (okay...two) valid reasons to choose McDonalds while on vacation.

1) New York is already expensive. McD's is cheap. If eating at this chain makes the trip easier on people's pocket books, is it not better than their not having come at all?

2) It's fast. When on vacation, I usually forget to factor in time to eat, because frankly, there are so many other things I want to see and do! If it came down to a choice between trying out a "typically New York" eatery and an extra 45 mins in a museum...no contest. The museum wins in a heartbeat.

I'm not saying that there aren't people who would rather not go outside their comfort zones. But there are also those who simply have different priorities/interests.

laura k said...

Canrane, you're right, but you're not factoring in that there is so much inexpensive - cheap - food in New York, really good food that is as cheap or even cheaper than McDonald's. If you get any kind of "cheap eats" guide, you can have a three-course lunch at a French lunch counter for $7.00, or a huge, freshly cooked breakfast for $5.99. There are many other examples. It takes a little more work to find, but your experience in New York will be so much richer (and tastier!) for it.

You're right in that everyone has different priorities. Some people don't care about food and don't care where they eat, and that's their option.

But if you like food and eating experiences, New York doesn't have to be expensive. I know, as I was poor in New York for a long time. :)

laura k said...

Also, there is no such thing as a typical New York eatery. There's just too much variety. Just like Toronto, I couldn't begin to say what is typical.

allan said...

New York is already expensive. McD's is cheap. If eating at this chain makes the trip easier on people's pocket books, is it not better than their not having come at all?

Yo, farmboy! Just shut the fuck up and go to ah fuckin' diner, alright? Eat a omelet or a fuckin' BLT! There's one over on turdy-turd street! (/extreme brooklyn accent)

laura k said...

OMG, I'm cracking up. That (fake) rant is much funnier if you can say it in the proper accent.

I feel like relating a story about something I saw in DiFara Pizza on Avenue J in Brooklyn, but it might not translate very well...