2.08.2007

breaking news: ehren watada will not go to jail

The court martial of Lt. Ehren Watada has ended in a mistrial. A new trial has been scheduled for... March 19! Does that date sound familiar? It's the fourth anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq. Nice touch, judge!

Watada's lawyers, however, believe a retrial is "very unlikely", and will argue that jeopardy attaches. Eric Seitz explains here.

See Courage to Resist for updates.

A mistrial is not the ideal outcome, but it sure beats a guilty verdict and jail time.

3 comments:

M@ said...

Got the e-mail update earlier -- this is excellent news. I'll be happier when the retrial idea gets put to bed, but I'm so happy about the outcome.

While I agree that the outcome is not the ideal one, there must have been immense pressure on the prosecutors to make an example of Watada. As you say, any result that keeps Watada out of jail is a good result.

I heard some ass (Gibson I think) on Fox News the other day interview Watada's father... then he talked to a military trials expert of some kind, and asked him whether Watada might have joined the military specifically to cause problems. (To the expert's credit, he said no, he had no reason to think that was the case -- though he should have said "what are you, an idiot?") Unreal.

Thanks for posting on this issue, Laura, it's an important one.

L-girl said...

Well, thanks for caring.

and asked him whether Watada might have joined the military specifically to cause problems.

Oy vey. It's the old "outside agitator" card. Whether it's the union organizer in the factory or the rebels in the village or the military officer who opposes the war, if they "cause trouble" they must be outsiders. All "our people" are happy slaves, and no one who is "real" military could do this.

James said...

Oy vey. It's the old "outside agitator" card. Whether it's the union organizer in the factory or the rebels in the village or the military officer who opposes the war, if they "cause trouble" they must be outsiders. All "our people" are happy slaves, and no one who is "real" military could do this.

Related to the "True Scotsman" fallacy, which goes something like:

-- No Scotsman puts sugar on his porridge.
-- Nonsense! I'm a Scot and I put sugar on my porridge.
-- Ah, but no true Scotsman puts sugar on his porridge!

More often seen in the US as the "True Patriot" fallacy, of course.