1.05.2007

i take the bus

Today was my first commute from the new place. It wasn't so bad. Nothing beats walking to the GO train and zipping in from Port Credit, but this was fine.

The GO bus, at least the one I took, is a little shabby and run-down compared to the Lakeshore trains, but no matter. More importantly, I wasn't nauseated as I often am on buses, and I even managed to read! Although it was risky, I had to try it, and was sure to put the book away as we hit city traffic at the very end.

The Union Station Bus Terminal, on the east side of Union Station, gives me a longer walk to work, but that's kind of nice. In bad weather I can walk through the station anyway. Best of all, Cooksville is the last stop before Union, so it's really very fast.

I wish I could walk from home to the bus, since Allan will often have to wake up to drive me after working til 1:00 a.m. the night before. I agreed to the house on condition that he not complain about this.

* * * *

I am very happy to admit that Allan was right about the house. It's great. It's more spacious, more modern, and just altogether nicer than the old place.

Lower rent is nice, too. I think one reason I loved the other house so much was that I was just so thrilled to live in a house (instead of an apartment) and to have a backyard. My last five or so years in New York, I was really missing that. But leaving aside location and just comparing house to house, this one is way better.

14 comments:

Scott M. said...

As you take the GO bus more often, you'll probably grow to know the differences between the different models of buses, which ones are better than others and where to sit for optimal conditions.

For instance, when travelling South in the morning or North in the evening, it's best to sit on the non-driver's side to avoid the sun in your eyes. In addition, buses with wheelchair lifts are in general more comfortable than the buses with low floors, and the best seat for leg room (a problem for me) is the one just behind the wheelchair lift.

Two important GO bus notes:

1) The driver does NOT know what the temperature is like in the back. All GO Bus drivers I have ever encountered are GREAT people, and absolutely every one of them are willing to turn up/down the heat/AC on request. So if you're boiling, and you look around and others are too, just go up and ask!

2) It may appear that some buses' overhead lighting system is not working. This is not the case... the driver may have accidentily left the master switch off. They'll be happy to turn it on for you if you ask!

I can't stress how happy I've been with the many, many GO bus drivers I've dealt with. Great people all around!

L-girl said...

Thanks, Scott! I figured you'd have some helpful details for me.

The bus I take travels parallel to my old train, east on the QEW, so I it's likely the same seating tricks apply.

That's good to know re temperature adjustment - since I am almost always overheated. Unless people around me are shivering, I'm undoubtedly too warm.

Fortunately my trip is short, so even if I'm uncomfortable, it's soon over.

L-girl said...

I also forgot to mention that the riders on this line look much more representative of Mississauga. It's a more diverse crowd.

The majority of Lakeshore line riders are white, with only a smattering of visible minorities. (Although one frequently hears Polish, Italian and other languages spoken.) On the Milton line, riders are the huge colourful mix that you are more likely to see in Mississauga. I like it.

James said...

Although it was risky, I had to try it, and was sure to put the book away as we hit city traffic at the very end.

This is where an MP3 player full of books-on-tape and/or podcasts is great. :)

L-girl said...

This is where an MP3 player full of books-on-tape and/or podcasts is great. :)

Right. Earlier, Scott suggested renting books on CD from the library, which would also work.

I honestly don't know if I could listen to a book, instead of reading. I don't think I'd be able to concentrate. But it's worth a try.

So far, my stomach stayed still, so maybe I'll be lucky and keep reading the old fashioned way. :)

Scott M. said...

I've found Books-on-CD more enjoyable than I thought I would, actually!

Don't forget if Allan can't pick you up, the very next stop after Cooksville is Square One, which is closer to you and a Mississauga Transit hub. And your Cooksville 10-ride is valid there (it's a different zone but the same cost from Union so you can travel to there).

L-girl said...

Don't forget if Allan can't pick you up, the very next stop after Cooksville is Square One, which is closer to you and a Mississauga Transit hub.

I get a cab home from work, paid for by the firm. That's standard practice for evenings or nights in a big law firm. There's little or no Mississauga transit available at the times I need it. I'm not commuting standard 9-5 hours, which is why the commute was such an issue.

If I did work standard hours, Mississauga Transit has a shuttle bus that goes from our nabe to the Cooksville GO in the morning and back in the evening - for only $0.50! I could walk to the stop and it would be great. But it doesn't run during the time I need it.

James said...

I honestly don't know if I could listen to a book, instead of reading. I don't think I'd be able to concentrate. But it's worth a try.

I was the same way. But then I listened to Douglas Adams reading "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" and Spike Milligan reading his war memoirs, and I changed my mind -- with the right reader, audiobooks can be brilliant. Of course, it helps that HHGttG was originally written as a radio play and Spike Milligan was originally a radio comedian!

Also, there are many periodical podcasts -- amateur and professional -- on a lot of topics which make for great listening. You might be interested in The DisabilityNation Podcast, for example. (Mind, I don't know anything about it other than that it exists -- it might be a load of fetid dingo's kidneys (speaking of Douglas Adams) for all I know.)

L-girl said...

it might be a load of fetid dingo's kidneys

LOL

I actually don't own an iPOD, and haven't wanted one at all. But if I can't read on the bus, that may change. :)

Scott M. said...

A quick note... any mp3 player will work for podcasts. You don't need to get the awfully expensive iPod (unless you want to).

L-girl said...

I should have said I don't have an MP3 player - I haven't felt the need.

James said...

There's a great audiobook store in Toronto at Bay & Adelaide (I think it is). I got all the Wingfield Farm plays on CD there, as well as the HHGttG radio shows (including the new series, created posthumously from the later books) and several other great recordings.

You can get an MP3 player suitable for playing these sorts of things for not much -- you can find them for under $40 IIRC. I use mine when heading into work and back home, and when cycling.

(For those who don't know the HHGttG, "a load of fetid dingo's kidneys" was one of Douglas Adams's memorable phrases from the radio play/book/TV show)

imark said...

Check the GO website when travelling on the weekends. Depending on what's happening in the city GO sometimes changes the location of arrivals and departures for buses to York St. and Bremner Blvd. inbetween the Rogers Centre and the Air Canada Centre.

L-girl said...

Thanks, imark. Since I work on Sundays (and hope eventually to work on Saturdays, too), that will be something I'll need.