12.07.2006

favour

If you link to wmtc, could you please take a minute and update your link so it points to the new URL? I would appreciate it. Thank you.

25 comments:

Tom said...

Besides Favour and Neighbour, what other new "our" words am I going to have to learn. Is there a rule to it?

P.S. I update the link weeks ago.

L-girl said...

Thanks, Tom. :)

Let's see... behaviour, honour, colour... most words that end in -or become -our. But I don't know if there's a rule.

I think we were talking about this recently in comments. Someone mentioned centre, metre, kilometre.

The hardest one for me is remembering to call the letter z "zed". It comes up at work and I'm always wrong.

L-girl said...

One of our favourites is "cheque" which (at home) we jokingly pronounce "checkway".

We also call SportsCentre "sports sentry" to distinguish it from the US "SportsCenter".

But don't tell anyone.

Tom said...

LOL. I forgot about re vs er.

I am going to be in trouble for awhile. The metric system alone will take much adjusting. Luckily Emilio was raised with it.

L-girl said...

But - as many people here have pointed out - Canada is not consistently metric either. People give their height and weight in feets, inches and pounds. In the supermarket, I order coffee by the pound - but the price is by kilos. Deli is in kilograms, but fruit is priced per lb. Etc. etc.

I found the switch pretty easy - mostly just km/hr for driving, and Celsius for the temperature.

I recommend going cold turkey. No converting, just get used to the new numbers.

impudent strumpet said...

You can speak Celsius already? I'm impressed! My parents speak Farenheit (as well as Celsius) but I've never been able to absorb it.

Fun fact about the word metre: that spelling is used only for units of measurement. For measuring devices (parking meters, gas meters, speedometers) you use the -er spelling. Mnemonic: tools end in -er (stapler, screwdriver, eraser) because they're verb-based. But if you can't remember that don't worry, no one cares except my grade 12 physics teacher who made us stand up in front of the class and recite stuff if we got it wrong.

Also, the U sometimes goes away when a suffix is added to -our endings. So glamour becomes glamorous, but honour becomes honourable. I don't know the exact rule for this, so I tend to just set my spell-check to Canadian English and let it decide.

L-girl said...

You can speak Celsius already? I'm impressed!

Well thanks - but don't be.

Here's the secret to my success. Every morning before walking Cody, I check the weather online. Then I go outside. Every single day. After a full year of that, I learned to associate the number with how it feels. It was pretty easy.

Once in a while, if I'm especially fuzzy-brained that morning, I go to my favourite conversion site and plug in the number, just to double-check - so I know what jacket to wear or whether to take gloves.

L-girl said...

Also, the U sometimes goes away when a suffix is added to -our endings. So glamour becomes glamorous, but honour becomes honourable.

Oh dear! I didn't know that.

gito said...

done:-)

redsock said...

"... blah blah blah why didn't you learn all this *before* you came to canada? you know nothing of canada and its history -- just admit it. and this blog is nothing but a desperate cry for attention, admit it, damn, admit it, blah blah blah ..." (now i have to go sit in my corner and obsess on wmtc for the next five hours...(/troll)

L-girl said...

LOL. Thanks Gare.

M@ said...

I've brought this up before: there are two Ls in the Canuck travelling, and only one in the American.

I don't know why this rule is so interesting to me, but it is. It's the forgotten Canadian variation.

There was a funny bit from a Canadian standup (Lorne Elliot) who asked how many KILometres there are in a kilOMetre. It is funny that there is no consensus on the pronunciation in Canada. (Is there any rule? Imp/Strump?)

Granny said...

Neat little gadget online that converts Celsius to Fahrenheit or vice versa. Makes me sound much more intelligent than I am.

I'll check that link. Thanks for the update.

L-girl said...

Hi Granny! Here's the conversion page I mentioned.

I've brought this up before: there are two Ls in the Canuck travelling, and only one in the American.

I've been looking for the recent thread where we discussed spelling differences, but I guess it wasn't as recent as I thought, because I can't find it. I'll look later today and post it here.

L-girl said...

Found it. Maybe I'll combine all these and make it a post. Save it for a day I have nothing to say.

Anne alias Purrceyz said...

Actually doctor's scales are in kilograms...although they will usually convert for you. When my daughter was born, we got her weight in grams and asked them to convert it to lbs/ozs.
Although I was taught imperial in school (metric didn't come to Canada till the 70s & I was in high school then), I'm mostly able to cope with metric except for weight measures which as another poster pointed out aren't consistent. (Why does my local supermarket post their produce prices in imperial but their scales are only metric?).

Another word you'll sometimes notice a variant spelling for is program/programme. The first usually is a verb or a computer program, the second is a TV or radio show. (Although this usage isn't consistent.)

You will sometimes see "American" spellings. For years, the Toronto Star used the spelling "color" and used to get annoyed readers complaining it should be "colour". Their response was that "color" was used in the Canadian Press stylebook which they followed. I think they finally changed this..

Anne alias Purrceyz said...

Forgot to add...in the 70s, they tried to introduce metric measures for cooking here in Canada. It failed miserably.

Part of the problem is that they didn't go to a metric system like Britain who use weights for solid ingredients & volume for liquids. Instead they went to a volume only measurement system, unique to Canada. So Canadian were encouraged to buy new measuring cups & measuring spoons and use measures like 30 ml as well as celius for oven temperatures (many recipes still give heat in both fahrenheit and celsius). A lot of recipes had measurements in both.

It was a failure and the government quietly stopped promoting this system in the 80s. However, you can still see Canadian cookbooks from this period in used bookstores that used this system.

PS. On the cooking subject, Canadian all purpose flour is higher in gluten than US flour. It is closer to what Americans call "bread flour". So if you want a softer crumb (like cakes, pastry), you should use Canadian "cake and patry" flour.

Scott M. said...

Hi Granny! Here's the conversion page I mentioned.

I just use Google and type in "25 F in C" or "half tablespoon in mL" or "20 mm mercury in kilopascals" and use the built-in conversion calculator.

L-girl said...

Oh, I love that conversion site. I like the way it's set up, and all the choices you get. I have it bookmarked and use it all the time.

Anonymous said...

Just did it.

I wanted to wait till you brought it up :)

impudent strumpet said...

There was a funny bit from a Canadian standup (Lorne Elliot) who asked how many KILometres there are in a kilOMetre. It is funny that there is no consensus on the pronunciation in Canada. (Is there any rule? Imp/Strump?)

IRL, I hear everyone say kilOMetre. However, my physics teacher insisted that emphasizing the second syllable implied that it was a measuring device and emphasizing the first syllable implied that it was a unit of measure. (He cited micrOMeter vs. MICrometre, but I either forget or never learned what a micrOMeter actually is.) Since KILometre always made more sense to me personally, and the punishment for saying kilOMetre was having to stand up in front of the class and say KILometre 10 times, I use KILometre now. However, the only people I know who do that had the same physics teacher I did, or are ESL.

there are two Ls in the Canuck travelling, and only one in the American.

I suck at that rule. And it's included in Word's autocorrect, so I've never actually internalized it. I just type whatever and the spellcheck fixes it for me. The other word that I really suck at is jewelry/jewelery/jewellry/jewellery. At least two are legitimate Can./US/UK spelling variations, at least one is just wrong, and I have no idea which is which.

L-girl said...

IRL, I hear everyone say kilOMetre.

I have never, ever heard anyone say KILometres.

Teachers who make students stand up in front of a classroom and repeat something are sadists and should not be teachers.

impudent strumpet said...

Luckily he isn't any more. The year he taught me was his last year before retirement. If he's still alive now, he's pushing 80 (and childless, unless he managed to breed late in life, which is highly unlikely as long as women outnumber men in the world.) I hope the assisted-living caregivers on whom he is or will soon be dependent are all former students of his.

L-girl said...

I hope the assisted-living caregivers on whom he is or will soon be dependent are all former students of his.

:-)

Ah, our fantasies of justice.

L-girl said...

Probably no one's reading this thread anymore, but I thought defense/defence.