7.24.2006

protest

Hundreds of thousands of people around the world demonstrated on Saturday to protest Israel's bombing of Lebanon. In Toronto, thousands of people gathered, also condemnng Stephen Harper's endorsement of Israel's actions.
Hundreds of red and white Lebanese flags waved on Toronto's downtown streets as thousands of protestors called for an end to the violence in Lebanon.

To the beat of drums, the demonstrators yesterday gathered first at the Israeli consulate on Bloor St. W. before marching to the United States consulate on University Ave.

The horde chanted slogans condemning Israel for the deaths of Lebanese civilians and slammed Prime Minister Stephen Harper's comments calling Israel's response "measured."

Many also called for sanctions and a boycott of Israeli goods and businesses. The chants that rang out included "Shame, Shame, Shame," "The people united will never be defeated," "Shame on you Mr. Harper" and "Arab lives have value too."

. . .

The march began in front of the Israeli consulate under rain and ended at the U.S. Consulate under semi-clear skies. Peggy Nash, a member of Parliament for Parkdale-High Park, said the violence must stop.

"We are the voices of sanity, calling for peace," Nash, a New Democrat said.

The Toronto protest was part of several global demonstrations that took place yesterday.

. . . .

In Toronto yesterday, Zahie Awad was one of the many chanting in the crowd. But unlike many others, she was also in tears as she looked into the rows of protestors. Her son, a Canadian citizen, is now in Lebanon, trying to come to Canada with her grandson.

So far, it hasn't been easy, as her grandson's papers were lost when their home was destroyed. Appeals to the Canadian government have been unheeded, she said. She hasn't been able to sleep and yesterday, contact was cut off with her son as Israel stepped up its campaign, Awad said.

Hussein Awad, her other son, said they came to the rally so other Canadians could know what was happening in the Middle East.

"We need Canada to do its role," he said, calling for this country to broker a ceasefire.

Like Awad, all Roni Chaia has been thinking about is his father and sister in Lebanon.

"They say they don't know when they are going to get hit." Chaia said, adding his family is running out of water and food.

"There is no safe place for them in Lebanon."

For Khadijeh Rakie, who also has family in Lebanon, the rally affirmed the belief she has in Canadians.

"The amount of people who showed up today, it's inspiring," she said. "It shows that Canadians do care and that our prime minister is not reflective of the country."
Toronto Star story here.

18 comments:

Lone Primate said...

Maybe I'm nit-picking, but something doesn't ring true about Mrs. Awad's story about her son and grandson in Lebanon. If her son is a Canadian citizen, then he shouldn't need anyone's permission to bring his (dependent) son with him into Canada. Furthermore, if he himself was born in Canada, or became a Canadian citizen before the birth of his son, then his son is perforce a Canadian citizen, regardless of where he was born, and needs absolutely no one's leave to enter Canada. I suppose the one possible issue might be that his son's birth certificate is lost and he's old enough that his birth may arguably have preceeded Mr. Awad's citizenship (if naturalized), but, again, if his son is a dependent, he ought to be be able to bring the boy anyway.

I'm wondering if the problem may actually be that Mr. Awad has married a woman in Lebanon who is not a Canadian citizen. In that case, he would have to sponsor her. Despite being married to a Canadian citizen, she herself is not automatically guaranteed entry to Canada.

L-girl said...

LP, I don't understand. The story says:

So far, it hasn't been easy, as her grandson's papers were lost when their home was destroyed.

That explains it, no?

But really, my point in posting this story wasn't about any one person in particular.

Lone Primate said...

That explains it, no?

No, not really. As long as her son has his papers, he can enter the country. I suppose there might be concerns if the boy's undocumented that they're kidnapping someone, but if the boy's old enough to say "Yeah, this is my dad," and do it with conviction, that really shouldn't be an issue. Again, I really don't see the stumbling block. Of course, I'm not expert. I just don't see it.

Scott M. said...

I'm a little confused as well. Unless the grandson in question is over the age of 28 (in which case if he was a second-generation outside-born Canadian he would lose his citizenship if he didn't apply), he's entitled to enter Canada.

If they can't convince the immigration folks of the relation between the dad and the child, perhaps the problem is not due to stubborn immigration officials. It's hardly like the immigration officials are going to be picking on them in particular.

James said...

Off topic (well, harking back to the "Worse than Ken Lay" stuff): an example of more money than brains -- a description of a conversation on the UrbanBaby.com chat rooms from an article in New York magazine.

One night, a woman posts this seemingly non-rhetorical question: “If your [husband] had a 5mil trust fund would you stay home? 2 kids and [husband] does not work.” Responses range from a deadpan “uh, yeah” to “someone has to work ... 5 mil is not enough for forever.” A long thread branching off examines the premise that a trust fund providing interest of $350,000 to $500,000 is not enough to live on. “Not enough for whom?” asked one poster incredulously. Another poster replies, “Me. We currently live a 15k/month lifestyle, net, with 1 [child] and no school costs” -- and then promptly summarizes her expenses for an invisible audience: “7k rent, 1k PT sitter, eating out 1.5–2k, utilities 500, travelling 2k, clothing 1k, out and about ‘cash’ 1k.”

I'm pretty well off by Canadian standards (I'm looking for an CDN$80,000 job), but I can't imagine burning through US$15,000 a month. Eating out US$2,000? I can't eat that much eat-out.

Found at slacktivist.

Of course, I just saw an article about a US$32,000 chess set, so this isn't anything spectacular. I keep thinking of how much "stimulation" the economy gets from someone spending $32,000 on a chess set vs. 32 people spending $1000 each on a fridge (or otherpossible breakdowns).

L-girl said...

Eating out US$2,000? I can't eat that much eat-out.

Not that I admire this type of lifestyle, but this would be incredibly easy to do in NYC or L.A.. Not in Cleveland or Atlanta or St. Louis - but in New York, if you enjoyed restaurant going, especially if you also like wine, it would fly by in a snap.

This doesn't mean it's not excessive and wasteful by the standards of most people on earth, only that it would be easy - and fun - to accomplish.

James said...

Not that I admire this type of lifestyle, but this would be incredibly easy to do in NYC or L.A.. Not in Cleveland or Atlanta or St. Louis - but in New York, if you enjoyed restaurant going, especially if you also like wine, it would fly by in a snap.

On occasion I've been taken out to very pricy restaurants in Toronto, and ever time it's struck me that the food is, say, 25% to 50% better than at The Keg or Canyon Creek, but costs 2, 3, or 4 -- or more -- times as much. Maybe it's the Scottish half of my background, but I can't see paying that much more for something that's not that much better...

Then again, half my ancestry ate haggis and the other half ate cabbage, so who am I to talk about gastronomy?

That aside, the other examples in the quote -- except utilities -- also strike me as over-the-top. How do you justify going through $1000 in clothes every month, and consider it a necessary expense?

Scott M. said...

Admittedly, I'm not a gastronome, but I would not willingly submit to extensive eating out. I have a reasonable budget when I'm on the road with Rogers, but I always long for home.

If I go to the expensive restaurants, I end up with rich sauces which I quickly tire off. The less expensive restaurants tend to have high-fat alternatives.

I just get sick of it... to the extent that I insist that if I'm away for more than three days I must get a suite with a full kitchen (including oven -- hard to come by!).

L-girl said...

On occasion I've been taken out to very pricy restaurants in Toronto, and ever time it's struck me that the food is, say, 25% to 50% better than at The Keg or Canyon Creek, but costs 2, 3, or 4 -- or more -- times as much. Maybe it's the Scottish half of my background, but I can't see paying that much more for something that's not that much better...

It might be the Scottish background, or it might be the restaurant. We've had meals in top-end restaurant that simply defy description. The difference between that experience and the Keg or Canyon Creek is like the difference between Danielle Steele and Shakespeare. Both are writers, but you would hardly put them in the same category.

Not every meal is worth the high price, of course. And it shouldn't only be the food - it should be the overall dining experience.

I loved fine dining in NYC. And in NY, even casual dining can be very expensive, and New Yorkers are notorious for never cooking, so even ordinary eating can really run up a big bill.

Again, I'm not endorsing a $2,000/month dining habit.

I also thought the clothes budget was really extreme. But then, I don't care about clothes, so that's easy for me to say.

Lone Primate said...

I see your "cost of the war in Iraq" ticker's about to clock over the $300B mark. That's a lot of good eatin', even amongst the Knickerbockers. But I think they're eating even better in parts of Texas as a result, myself...

James said...

The difference between that experience and the Keg or Canyon Creek is like the difference between Danielle Steele and Shakespeare.

All the Shakespeare-quality meals I've ever had were in little tucked-away restaurants in Italy where dinner ran about 10 Euros a head. This photo was taken in one of them, behind the Piazza del Campo in Siena. The photo doesn't give you a feel for the food, but it shows how old the restaurant was...

I see your "cost of the war in Iraq" ticker's about to clock over the $300B mark. That's a lot of good eatin'

That's a $50 meal for every human on the planet, many of whom will never see $50 worth of currency gathered together in one place in their lifetime.

L-girl said...

All the Shakespeare-quality meals I've ever had were in little tucked-away restaurants in Italy where dinner ran about 10 Euros a head.

I had many Shakespeare-quality meals myself, in Italy and France, for pittance.

That doesn't make the ones I had in New York any less delicious or memorable. Merely different.

James said...

That doesn't make the ones I had in New York any less delicious or memorable. Merely different.

And more expensive. ;)

Though I suppose that, when you throw airfare in, it's probably cheaper to eat in NYC...

L-girl said...

Though I suppose that, when you throw airfare in, it's probably cheaper to eat in NYC...

And of course you can get excellent, inexpensive meals in New York - and extremely high-end meals in Florence, Rome, Venice, Paris, etc.

I have to go back over this thread to see how we got on this topic...

Lone Primate said...

I have to go back over this thread to see how we got on this topic...

James's non sequitur; his raison d'etre for revealing his salary expectations to all and sundry. :)

-canuck- said...

excuse me?

but didn't the lebanese provacateurs called hezbollah send at 150 rockets into northern israel yesterday alone?

M@ said...

Gee, Canuck, you're right. Time to flatten Lebanon, I guess. No alternative, really.

L-girl said...

Thanks, M@. I'm at a loss for how to respond to comments defending what Israel is doing right now (without completely lashing out). I was just going to ignore him.