10.18.2005

port credit in autumn

I took a long walk through our neighbourhood yesterday afternoon. Here's some of what I saw.

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This neighbourhood is full of huge new "McMansions",
but I prefer the smaller, older homes.


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24 comments:

David Cho said...

OMG! It's a lakeside neighborhood? I'm totally jealous.

You should start watching Desperate Housewives to get a lowdown on what to expect in the neighborhood.

Expat Traveler said...

I love the pics! Especially the one with the lake. Wow - so lovely. We finally had a beautiful day today but I've only been running and i find it too hard to run with my camera... lol...no fun...

L-girl said...

OMG! It's a lakeside neighborhood? I'm totally jealous.

I think you said that the last time I posted pictures of the lake. At least you're consistent! ;-)

We are a half-block from Lake Ontario. I walk the dogs along the lake every morning. It's totally, totally wonderful.

L-girl said...

i find it too hard to run with my camera

Same reason I go without the dogs. Can't do so many things to do at once!

L-girl said...

You should start watching Desperate Housewives

If I ever do this, you have my permission to shoot me.

RobfromAlberta said...

I confess I don't know the GTA very well. Where is Port Credit relative to downtown TO?

L-girl said...

Where is Port Credit relative to downtown TO?

About 20 minutes (by car) west of downtown, via the QEW, along Lake Ontario.

It used to be a factory town. We live across from where the corn starch factory was. Apparently it was not a desirable place to live because of the odor.

The factory closed around 10 years ago, et voila!, a suddenly attractive lakeside community.

Port Credit used to be an independent town, and was dragged kicking and screaming into suburban Mississauga, but it retains its village feel. It's called "Mississauga's Village on the Lake".

L-girl said...

You can see Port Credit relative to downtown T.O. on this map.

James said...

Here's the Google Map for Port Credit, centred on the gazebo from Laura's previous set of photos. You can zoom out and see how it relates to the rest of the world.

RobfromAlberta said...

Wow, that's pretty close. Houses must cost your firstborn around there.

L-girl said...

Houses must cost your firstborn around there.

No doubt. And there are very few rentals. (We rent.) Now you have some idea why I am amazed that we live here. We were unbelievably lucky.

Kyahgirl said...

Beautiful pics L. I'm glad you put them up.

mkk said...

Love the photos! The lake is amazing.

James said...

Off topic, some curious stats from No More Mister Nice Blog.

The thing that confuses me is, why is Winnipeg way up there?

L-girl said...

The thing that confuses me is, why is Winnipeg way up there?

Hmm, maybe if I knew something about Winnipeg...

Lone Primate said...

The thing that confuses me is, why is Winnipeg way up there?

That's the problem with a statistical sample that small. Twenty-two people in the course of a year in a population of over half a million is really not that surprising... a dozen jilted lovers, another dozen bad drug deals, and you've already topped Winnipeg's status... that's just one a month of each, and never mind random killings during other crimes. When you put it in those terms, it's not that hard to see how small numbers can amplify the range when they're contrast. With 22 as your pivot point, a few less or few more such incidents in a year can cause the rate to seem to fluctuate wildly.

On the other hand, I do see the puzzlement when it's contrast to places like Ottawa or Calgary, which are roughly the same size as Winnipeg, but apparently less prone to this kind of thing. It might be interesting to see what the rates have been year by year and see if the relatively low numbers, easily affected by random fluctuation, are consistent.

James said...

Hmm, maybe if I knew something about Winnipeg...

Everything you need to know about Winnipeg:

- It's flat
- Lots of mosquitos in summer
- Horribly cold in winter
- Winnie the Pooh is named after it.

My father's from Winkler, just south of there.

That's the problem with a statistical sample that small. Twenty-two people in the course of a year in a population of over half a million is really not that surprising...

True. When you're dealing with sample sizes that small, a single family murder/suicide can be reported as a "25% jump in the murder rate".

L-girl said...

Last night on the CBC I learned that Winnipeg is the geographic center of Canada. Michaelle Jean visited there, and she mentioned it in her speech.

By the way, she seems great! Inviting the whole crowd inside to get warm and shake hands. Very nice.

Winnie the Pooh is named after it.

No shit?! Wow, that's amazing.

Will blog about all this murder and Winnipeg stuff later.

Marnie said...

Newcomers to Canada should be handed a DVD containing all those Heritage Minute spots. Then you'd know about Winnie the Pooh's origins, and why the smell of burnt toast sets off jokes about seizures, and how Canada got its name.

Winnipeg boasts the windiest corner in the country, at Portage and Main, and has turned out a lot of good musicians, including Neil Young, Burton Cummings and Randy Bachman. But we can't emphasize the mosquitoes and the bitter winters strongly enough ...

L-girl said...

Newcomers to Canada should be handed a DVD containing all those Heritage Minute spots. Then you'd know about Winnie the Pooh's origins, and why the smell of burnt toast sets off jokes about seizures, and how Canada got its name.

I've seen the one on how Canada got its name! I'll keep an eye out for Pooh.

But we can't emphasize the mosquitoes and the bitter winters strongly enough ...

Ouch.

L-girl said...

And btw, I like that DVD idea. Too bad CIC doesn't have a suggestions box. ;-)

James said...

Winnie the Pooh is named after it.

No shit?! Wow, that's amazing.


The naming is a little indirect:

Back in WWI, the Winnipeg-based Fort Garry Horse Canadian Regiment stopped at White River, in Ontario, and found a stray bear cub. They named it "Winnipeg Bear" and adopted the bear as their mascot, taking him to England with them.

Winnipeg Bear was supposed to go back to Winnipeg for the zoo there, but the Regiment ended up leaving hmi at the London Zoo, where A.A. Milne saw him. Milne's son Christopher named his toy bear after Winnipeg Bear, and, of course, the stories are about the toy bear.

L-girl said...

Milne's son Christopher named his toy bear after Winnipeg Bear, and, of course, the stories are about the toy bear.

Ah-ha. I only knew Milne named them after his son's stuffed animal, but not the origin of said bear's name. Thanks!

Kyle_From_Ottawa said...

On the other hand, I do see the puzzlement when it's contrast to places like Ottawa or Calgary, which are roughly the same size as Winnipeg, but apparently less prone to this kind of thing.

No, Winnipeg is just more crime ridden then other cities its size. It's poorer than Ottawa or Calgary, and suffers from a fair bit of urban blight, though not nearly as much as a lot of major American cities.

From Wikipedia:
Winnipeggers consider crime, particularly violent crime and auto theft, to be a serious problem in their city. According to Statistics Canada, Winnipeg has one of the highest crime rates of any Canadian metropolitan area. In 2002, the City had the fourth highest overall crime rate in Canada with 10,879 Criminal Code of Canada offences per 100,000 population. Only Regina, Saskatoon, and Vancouver had higher crime rates. The crime rate was 50% higher than that of Calgary and more than double the rate for Toronto. In 2004, Statistics Canada reported that Winnipeg's crime rate had rose to over 12,000 offences per 100,000 population, and Winnipeg had the dubious distinction of having Canada's highest crime rate. The agency notes 2004 crime data from Winnipeg is based on estimates because of a switch-over by Winnipeg police in 2004 to a new records management system. As a result, it says the report may not be an accurate reflection of Winnipeg's crime rate for 2004. Crime rates were highest in the downtown area, the North End, the area immediately to the west of the downtown area, and the Elmwood area in the east end of Winnipeg. These areas are home to displaced populations including First Nations people, runaways, prostitutes, petty criminals and drug addicts and suffer from chronic poverty and urban blight. In fact the North End of Winnipeg is generally considered to be the second poorest area in all of Canada next to the Downtown Eastside in Vancouver. The crime rates in the outlying suburbs are much lower. (Source Statistics Canada, Neighbourhood Characteristics and Justice Research Paper Series 2004).