10.23.2005

halloween question

We're being good Halloween hosts this year.

In New York, we pretended we weren't home. Yup, we were mean old cranks. We just couldn't stand dealing with our neighbours and their kids and our barking dogs.

But now, being in a house, feeling so friendly and upbeat, I'm going all the way. Putting up decorations on the front door and steps, keeping a big supply of candy at the ready - and answering the door in costume! I'm thinking I'll get a rubber mask, that's always good for a startle. I'm not going to be Dick Cheney or anything, don't want to give anyone a massive coronary, but someone suitably gross.

My question is, is there charity attached to Trick Or Treat here? I know there's Trick Or Treat because I see all the stuff in the supermarket. But do kids also collect coins for charity? When I was a kid, the schools gave out these little orange cardboard Unicef boxes, and most houses put in a penny or two along with your candy. I remember my mom buying rolls of pennies.

No wonder my Halloween memories stand out: it was the only time all year we were allowed to eat candy. My parents were early health food types. Sugar was regarded as only slightly more nutritious than strychnine.

So, should we stock up on nickels or dimes along with the individual candies?

15 comments:

Marnie said...

I have seen Unicef boxes, but very few. (We always took them around when we were kids.) Whatever spare change you have around the house may be enough.

I gave out candy the first few years in this neighbourhood, but I had so few kids come to the door that I've given up on it. Geez, you can't give the stuff away! Other people get TONS of kids -- much depends on the neighbourhood. You might want to consult a neighbour about the usual turnout.

James said...

We don't participate ourselves, and which is fine in our neighbourhood -- not a lot of kids living on our block, in part because we live in "Church & Weseley South".

Anonymous said...

In our neighbourhood in Hamilton some of the high school kids collect non-perishable food items for the food banks. There are also some Unicef but not much. Mostly just tons and tons of kids.

ALPF

teflonjedi said...

When I was growing up in Vancouver, I remember kids coming around with Oxfam boxes, as well as the Unicef boxes. I've been gone a long time; I hope that folks still do that, though the food drives sound wonderful as well.

dogsled_stacie said...

Well, not sure what people do around here. Never had a trick or treater at my place! But then it would be pretty useless for kids to try around here where the places are too spread apart. Residential volume is what counts!!

But good for you getting into the spirit of Halloween. Watch out though, if you give really great stuff, the kiddies will remember and tell all their friends for next year!!

L-girl said...

Thanks you guys! I'm sure there'll be more answers as the read-blogs-at-work crew arrives.

You might want to consult a neighbour about the usual turnout.

It's got to be high - this neighbourhood is loaded with kids. There's a small parade to school every morning and a similar return parade in the afternoon. Most of our neighbours have Halloween decorations and pumpkins outside - which is the only reason I remembered it at all!

If there's a food drive (super idea, I agree), I'd have to be prepared for that. Maybe I'll ask about that part.

Marnie said...

>the kiddies will remember and tell all their friends for next year

Next year, heck, they'll text message each other on the spot and you'll be inundated. Parents will carpool their kids to the "good" (rich, generous) neighbourhoods. I'm spared because a block or two away is one of the swanky areas known for good treats, and the kids rush by my house to get there.

G said...

Have some coins on hand, even if it's pennies - many of the schools still do Unicef or similar charities, so it's good to have some change at the ready in case any kids do come by with collection boxes.

I give, but with a smirk. I always looked at the Unicef drive as prep training for future Jehovah's Witnesses ... but that's just me.

The bonus of Halloween is you never know how many kids will come to the door. Leftover candy rules!

L-girl said...

Next year, heck, they'll text message each other on the spot and you'll be inundated.

So TO-area kids are a bit behind? Not txtng this year? :-)

I give, but with a smirk.

As long as you give, charity doesn't care about your facial expression. :)

I always looked at the Unicef drive as prep training for future Jehovah's Witnesses ... but that's just me.

That would have been handy for the JWs, since every kids in the US grew up collecting for Unicef!

RobfromAlberta said...

When I arrived here a few years ago, I lived in an adults-only apartment complex, so we never had any trick-or-treaters, but since we moved to the 'burbs, we've been swamped with them. It's fun though. We always get a few with the UNICEF boxes.

Wrye said...

What constitutes "good treats" these days? Is it still mini chocolate bars?

And then of course there's the anti-treat, that molasses candy or whatever the hell it is...

G said...

Treats - so long as they are sweet and decidedly unhealthy, all is well.

Hint: when we were kids, the people who gave us apples or raisons were the ones who coincidentally found themselves cleaning egg off their houses the next day. Not that I know if that was related to the giving of healthy snacks or anything, or who even threw the eggs, of course.

Just saying.

melusina said...

Man, I miss Halloween! And it had been so long since I lived in a neighborhood in Nashville that actually had trick or treaters! I always loved all their little costumes, some were so original.

If I mention Halloween here I either get a blank stare or someone replies with "yes, black cats and yackolanters?"

I try to force my in-laws to watch a scary movie every Halloween, though.

Wrye said...

I recommend The Patriot

L-girl said...

I recommend The Patriot

As long as it's covered in caramel and dipped in chocolate, sure.

Treats should definitely be given without a care to nutrition. We stocked up on mini-candy bars like Snickers, Kit-Kats, Twix and M&Ms. That is, what we like so we can enjoy the leftovers if there are any.

The bonus of Halloween is you never know how many kids will come to the door. Leftover candy rules!

Word!