8.03.2005

see you later

I'm rushing out the door for an early appointment. Someone wants to interview these soon-to-be expatriates, then more New York City sightseeing is on my agenda.

For now, just a quick note. Fourteen more American lives wasted; make that 15.

Right after we chatted about the 401, that highway figured prominently in this scary story. How amazing and wonderful that no one was killed. It's on the front page of all the papers here, too.

More later, including replies to comments.

9 comments:

James said...

If ever you *have* to be involved in an airliner crash, that's the type to pick!

This was, I think, the largest crash at Toronto Pearson in terms of the size of the plane, so it'd doubly impressive that everyone got out. Congratulations to the pilot for controlling the landing as well as he did!

Mario said...

Looking at images of the airplane after the crash, I am just amazed that noone got killed. The passengers must have been flying out of the wreck after the crash... Any more information about the cause of it all?

James said...

The best info I've seen suggests that the plane was hit by lightning after it had touched down.

My mother thakes that flight regularly. Fortunately, she wasn't on it this time.

Lone Primate said...

Man, if you have to be in a plane crash, that's sure the way to do it.

I hope you'll tell us more about the interview when you get back, LK. :)

RobfromAlberta said...

For now, just a quick note. Fourteen more American lives wasted; make that 15.

What may be even more shocking is what happened on Monday.

The six sniper team members were killed in a firefight near Haditha.

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/meast/08/03/iraq.main/index.html

These snipers were killed in a firefight. Usually, snipers are pretty well-protected and they are among the most highly-trained troops in the military. To lose that many in a single engagement indicates a significant tactical failure. Either the US Marines are suffering from combat fatigue or the Iraqi insurgents are getting more skilled than anyone could have imagined. Neither possibility is very comforting.

G said...

Had the news on streaming radio as it happened.

Of course, our first thoughts upon hearing of a plane crash (involving flames shooting skyward) was of this possibly being an attack. Props to CFRB AM 1010 for not getting in on that approach, and for stressing this did not at all appear to be an attack, but rather most likely the weather (which appears to be the case).

In fact, their coverage of the event was much more detailed than that which was on TV when I got home (surfing btw CBC, City, Global, and CNN). It proved a major point for media everywhere: the radio is still instrumental when it comes to breaking news, and the personalities at 1010 AM offered some outstanding, insightful analysis and commentary. Well done!

1010 CFRB Toronto can be heard live here.

(and thank God no one was killed in that crash - truly a miracle.)

Marnie said...

I watched CTV and found it pretty informative, but I didn't flip over to CBC to compare. They certainly didn't mention terrorism, anyway. I was impressed by the number of reporters on the scene (airport, local hospitals) within a short period of time. Debbi Wilkes, a figure skating commentator and familiar presence to many, was driving by Pearson as the crash happened, and she phoned in with her report.

L-girl said...

My mother thakes that flight regularly.

Oh my god, thank goodness she wasn't on it, even though no one was killed, you'd have been frantic with worry.

Of course, our first thoughts upon hearing of a plane crash (involving flames shooting skyward) was of this possibly being an attack. Props to CFRB AM 1010 for not getting in on that approach, and for stressing this did not at all appear to be an attack, but rather most likely the weather (which appears to be the case).

Absolutely. Good on them.

Debbi Wilkes, a figure skating commentator and familiar presence to many, was driving by Pearson as the crash happened, and she phoned in with her report.

It's always cool when someone can do that. I'll never forget watching the 1989 World Series, when the earthquake struck, and sportscaster Al Michaels was suddenly The Man On The Scene. He stayed on air (from the broadcast truck) for hours, and became the eyes and ears for millions.

James said...

"Oh my god, thank goodness she wasn't on it, even though no one was killed, you'd have been frantic with worry."

I tend not to get frantic, but it certainly wouldn't have been pleasant. Last time my SO & I flew back from Europe (out of Rome) there was a major crash in Milan; our bosses back here were pretty worried.

I have to admit, the possibility of it being an attack simply didn't occur to me until these comments -- crashes are far more common than attacks. Then again, it's been 22 years since the last major crash at Pearson, but only 20 years since the last terrorist attack in Canada. (Then again again, Flight 182 didn't go through Pearson, so it's not a fair comparrison.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_India_Flight_182